AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

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AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. May 2004, Volume 6, Number 5.

Suggested Reading and Resources

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Resources on Medicine's Response to Terrorism

Further Reading

  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Training Clinicians for Public Health Events Relevant to Bioterrorism Preparedness. Accessed March 15, 2004.
  • Alexander GC, Wynia MK. Ready and willing? Physicians' sense of preparedness for bioterrorism. Health Affairs. 2003;22:189-197.
  • American Academy of Pediatrics. AAP task force on terrorism to help prepare pediatricians for disaster response. AAP News. 2002;20:4.
  • American College of Emergency Physicians. Positioning America's Emergency Health System to Respond to Acts of Terrorism. Accessed April 2, 2004.
  • American College of Surgeons. Disasters from Biological and Chemical Terrorism—What Should the Individual Surgeon Do? A Report from the Committee on Trauma. Accessed March 23, 2004.
  • American Hospital Association, Office of Emergency Preparedness, Department of Health and Human Services. Hospital Preparedness for Mass Casualties. Chicago: AHA; 2000.
  • American Medical Association. Declaration of professional responsibility: medicine's social contract with humanity. September 2001. Accessed April 13, 2004.
  • American Medical Association. Disaster Preparedness. Accessed April 2, 2004.
  • American Nurses Association. Code of Ethics. 2001. Accessed April 2, 2004.
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  • Annas GJ. Bioterrorism and public health law. JAMA. 2002;288:2685-2686.
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  • Association of American Medical Colleges. Professional responsibility in treating AIDS patients. J Med Educ. 1988;63:587-590.
  • Association of American Medical Colleges. Training Future Physicians About Weapons of Mass Destruction: Report of the Expert Panel on Bioterrorism Education for Medical Students. Washington, DC: AAMC; 2003. Accessed April 1, 2004.
  • Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO). Bioterrorism Preparednesss. Accessed April 2, 2004.
  • Atlas RM. National security and the biological research community. Science. 2002;298:753-754.
  • Bayer R, Colgrove J. Bioterrorism, public health and the law. Health Aff. 2002;21:98-101.
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  • Center for Law and the Public's Health. Accessed March 13, 2004.
  • Center for Law and the Public's Health at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities. The Model State Emergency Health Powers Act. Accessed May 2, 2004.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Assessment of the epidemiologic capacity in state and territorial health departments—United States, 2001. MMWR Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep. Oct 31, 2003;52:1049-1051.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Biological and chemical terrorism: strategic plan for preparedness and response. Recommendations of the CDC Strategic Planning Workgroup. MMWR Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep. April 21, 2000;49:1-14.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Bioterrorism agents/diseases. Accessed March 23, 2004.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mortality data from the national vital statistics system. Accessed April 14, 2004.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Protecting Americans: smallpox vaccination program. Accessed April 22, 2004
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. State Emergency Preparedness and Response Inventory. Atlanta, Ga: CDC; February 2002. Accessed April 13, 2004.
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Terrorism preparedness in state health departments—United States, 2001-2003. MMWR Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep. Oct 31, 2003;52:1051-1053.
  • Chemical-terrorism preparedness—public health laboratories found unprepared and overwhelmed. J Environ Health. 2003;66:35-36.
  • Chinese SARS Molecular Epidemiology Consortium. Molecular evolution of the SARS coronavirus during the course of the SARS epidemic in China. Science. 2004;303:1666-9. [Epub January 29, 2004.]
  • Clark CC. In harm's way: AMA physicians and the duty to treat. J Med Philos. January 2005; forthcoming.
  • Clarke RA, Metzl JF, Rudman WB. Emergency Responders: Drastically Underfunded, Dangerously Underprepared. Washington, DC: Council on Foreign Relations; 2003.
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  • Coule PL, Dallas CE, James JJ, et al, eds. Chapter 1. In: Basic Disaster Life Support Provider Manual. V 2.5. Chicago, Ill: American Medical Association; 2004.
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  • DeGuerre C. Case in health law. Good Samaritan statues: are medical volunteers protected?Virtual Mentor. April 2004.
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  • Donohoe MT. Bioterrorism curricula too limited. Acad Med Online. April 11, 2004. Accessed May 11, 2004.
  • Donohoe MT. Factory farms, antibiotics, and anthrax. Z Magazine. January 2003. Accessed May 11, 2004.
  • Eckenwiler LA. Emergency health professionals and the ethics of crisis. In: Moreno JD, ed. In the Wake of Terror: Medicine and Morality in a Time of Crisis. Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press; 2003:111-131.
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  • Fauci AS. Biodefence on the research agenda. Nature. 2003;421:787.
  • Filoromo C, Macrina D, Pryor E, Terndrup T, McNutt SD. An innovative approach to training hospital-based clinicians for bioterrorist attacks. Am J Infec Control. 2003;31:511-514.
  • Fong T. Preparing for disaster: healthcare providers try to ready themselves for biological, chemical attacks without the benefit of government funding. Mod Healthc. 2003;33:2-7,16.
  • Fox DM. The politics of physicians' responsibility in epidemics: a note on history. Hastings Cent Rep. 1988;18:S5-10.
  • Fraser MR, Fisher VS. Elements of Effective Bioterrorism Preparedness: A Planning Primer for Local Public Health Agencies. National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO). Accessed April 2, 2004.
  • Friedlander WJ. On the obligation of physicians to treat AIDS: is there a historical basis? Rev Infect Dis. 1990;12:191-203.
  • Geraghty KE, Wynia M. Advocacy and community: the social roles of physicians in the last 1000 years. Part III. MedGenMed. 2000:E27.
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  • Gostin LO, Sapsin JW, Teret SP, et al. The Model State Emergency Health Powers Act: planning for and response to bioterrorism and naturally occurring infectious diseases. JAMA. 2002;288:622-628.
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  • Heyman D. Lessons from the Anthrax Attacks: Implications for US Bioterrorism Preparedness. April 2002. Unpublished report. Available at: www.fas.org. Accessed March 29, 2004.
  • Institute of Medicine. The Future of the Public's Health in the 21st Century. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2003.
  • Institute of Medicine. Insuring America's Health. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2004. Accessed March 2, 2004.
  • Jackson BA, Peterson DJ, Bartis JT, et al. Protecting Emergency Responders. Santa Monica, CA: RAND; 2003. Accessed April 14, 2004.
  • Knobler SL, Mahmoud AAF, Pray LA, eds. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities. Washington, DC: National Academies Press; 2002.
  • Landers SJ. Immigrants swell ranks of uninsured. American Medical News. August 21, 2000. Accessed March 3, 2004.
  • Levy BS, Sidel VW, eds. Terrorism and Public Health. New York: Oxford University Press; 2003.
  • Levy BS, Sidel VW, eds. War and Public Health. New York: Oxford University Press; 1997. (Updated paperbound edition, Washington, DC: American Public Health Association; 2000).
  • Levy BS, Sidel VW. War and public health in the twenty-first century. N Engl J Health Policy. 2004;19:167-178.
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  • Moreno JD, ed. In the Wake of Terror: Medicine and Morality in a Time of Crisis. Cambridge, Mass: MIT; 2003.
  • Moreno JD. A new world order of human experiments. Account Res. 2003;10:47-56.
  • National Academy of Sciences. Biotechnology Research in an Age of Terrorism. Washington, DC: National Academy Press; 2003.
  • National Association of County and City Health Officials. NACCHO Responds to Bioterrorism. Accessed April 2, 2004.
  • National Association of Emergency Medical Services Physicians. Ethics Committee. Ethical Challenges in Emergency Medical Services. Accessed March 29, 2004.
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