AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. December 2006, Volume 8, Number 12: 881-884.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Global Health: Ethics of International Medical Volunteerism.

Naheed Rehman Abbasi, MD, MPH, is a resident in dermatology at New York University Medical Center in New York City. She was the American Medical Assocation student representative on the Council of Ethical and Judicial Affairs from 2001-2003 and has worked as a public health volunteer in Bangladesh, Mexico and Pakistan.

Olga Bornemisza, MSc, is a research fellow in the Conflict and Health Programme, Health Policy Unit at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the U.K. Her research interests include inter-agency evaluations in conflict settings and health service delivery.

Katherine L. Cauley, PhD, is director of the Center for Healthy Communities and the Global Health Program and associate professor in the School of Professional Psychology and the Department of Community Health, all at Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. Her research interests are community academic partnerships and multiprofessional community-based education and research.

Craig J. Conard is a fourth-year student at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, La. He received a National Institutes of Health Fogarty-Ellison Fellowship to study malaria vaccination in Mali, West Africa.

Richard Currie, MD, is a rural family physician, currently pursuing enhanced skills residency training at the Department of Family Medicine, Division of International Health of the University of British Columbia, in Vancouver. His research focuses on pharmaceutical patent law and equitable access to essential medicines.

Karen B. DeSalvo, MD, MPH, MSc, is an associate professor of medicine and the C. Thorpe Ray Chair of Medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, La. Her research interests include health care delivery and health policy.

Michael Godkin, PhD, is professor of family medicine and community health and director of the International Medical Education Program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worchester. His research interests focus on the impact of global education on medical students’ cultural competence and desire to work with multicultural and underserved populations.

L. Lee Hamm, MD, is a professor of medicine and chairman of the Department of Medicine at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, La.

Rebecca Hope, MD, is a junior doctor working in Cornwall, England. She became involved in international health through Europe’s first bachelor of science program in International Health at University College London’s International Health and Medical Education Centre. Dr. Hope wrote The Elective Pack: A Medical Student's Guide to International Health and Development to help students and doctors prepare for overseas work. In 2004 she founded Alma Mata Global Health Network for health professionals interested in training, research and careers in international health. She has worked on projects with Save the Children, the Centre for International Child Health in London and Gudalur Adivasi Hospital, India, to study and improve community-based health insurance in low-income settings.

Mark J. Kahn, MD, is a professor of medicine and associate dean for admissions and student affairs at Tulane University School of Medicine in New Orleans, La. His research interests include palliative care and medical education.

Jennifer Kasten, MSc, is a second-year student at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. She earned master’s degrees in infectious disease epidemiology and policy at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and in the history of medicine at Oxford University while pursuing research interests in tropical medicine, malaria epidemiology, pediatric surgery and interactions between surgery and tropical infectious diseases.

Tara Leevy, LLB, LLM, is a health law fellow at Loyola University Chicago. Her bachelor of law degree is from the University of the West Indies, Cave Hill, and her master of law is from Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Justin M. List, MAR, a former fellow at the American Medical Association’s Institute for Ethics, is a second-year medical student at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. He received his master’s degree with a concentration in ethics from Yale University Divinity School and worked at Yale’s Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics. He was the theme issue editor for the November 2006 Virtual Mentor.

Edward O'Neil, Jr., MD, is an emergency physician at Caritas St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center in Boston and author of “Awakening Hippocrates: A Primer on Health, Poverty, and Global Service.” He is also the founder of Omni Med, a nongovernmental organization that sends physicians and other health volunteers overseas to serve in programs in Belize, Kenya, Thailand and Guatemala, among other locales.

Robert D. Orr, MD, is a consultant in clinical ethics at the Center for Bioethics and Human Dignity, Bannockburn, Ill., and clinical professor of family medicine at the University of Vermont, College of Medicine in Burlington.

Ronald Pust, MD, is professor of family and community medicine and public health at the University of Arizona in Tucson, where he directs the curriculum in international health. His interests include mycobacterial diseases and appropriate health care technology.

Josh Ruxin, MPH, PhD, is assistant clinical professor of public health at the Mailman School of Public Health and director of the Access Project for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria at the Center for Global Health and Economic Development—a joint venture of the Mailman School of Public Health and the Earth Institute at Columbia University in New York City. He is also country director for the Millennium Village Project in Rwanda and a member of the Global HIV Prevention Working Group.

Egbert Sondorp, MD, MPH, is a senior lecturer in the Conflict and Health Programme, Health Policy Unit at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in the U.K. His research interests include health service delivery in fragile states and post-conflict health sector reconstruction.

John L. Tarpley, MD, is professor of surgery, program director for general surgery and a master clinical teacher at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn. International health, history of medicine and the role of spirituality in clinical medicine are areas of particular interest to him. In October 2006, he won the American College of Surgeons Volunteerism Award.

Margaret Tarpley, MLS, is an associate in surgery education at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, Tenn. She conducts bibliographical research and is a Web master for the Association of Program Directors in Surgery.

Lauren Taggart Wasson, MPH, is a medical student at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City. Her graduate studies at Johns Hopkins University and work for the USAID-funded POLICY Project focused on international HIV/AIDS.

Mary Terrell White, PhD, is director of the Division of Medical Humanities at the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. Her research interests include ethical issues in global health, research ethics, decision making, and genetic testing and counseling.

Staff contributors

Sarah Maitre is a fellow in the Institute for Ethics at the American Medical Association in Chicago, Ill. She will receive her medical degree from Oregon Health Sciences University in 2007.

Ololade Olakanmi is a research assistant in the Institute for Ethics at the American Medical Association in Chicago, Ill., where he assists with the Ethical Force program, an initiative to establish performance measures for ethical behavior across the health care system. He is also exploring the history of the relationship between organized medicine and African American physicians and African American patients.

Philip A. Perry, MSJ, is an assistant editor of Virtual Mentor and a research assistant in ethics at the American Medical Association in Chicago, Ill.

Theme issue editor

Megan Patrick Alcauskas, MD, is a neurology resident at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. She received her MD in May 2005 from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Her interest in international health and medical ethics began after she volunteered at a rural health clinic in Haiti as an undergraduate at Boston College. She spent her junior year at Oxford University studying medical sociology, specifically the interaction between medicine and politics in developing countries. While in medical school, Megan interned for a summer at the Department of Health and Human Services in the Global Health Office and was a member of American Medical Student Association’s National Health Policy Taskforce. She was also founder and editor of a health policy newsletter and was active in the hospital’s bioethics committee.