AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. September 2007, Volume 9, Number 9:658-659.

Contributors

About the Contributors

Theme issue: The Parental-Fetal Disconnect

Watson A. Bowes Jr., MD, is professor emeritus at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine. Prior to his retirement, he was a professor in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of North Carolina and previously at the University of Colorado. His major professional interests include high-risk obstetrics, preterm birth, and all aspects of labor and delivery. He is the past chairman of the committee on ethics of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and was a member of the Committee on Bioethics of the American Academy of Pediatrics from 1996 to 1999. He is currently chair of the ethics committee of the University of North Carolina Hospitals.

Andrew M. Courtwright, MA, is a teaching fellow in the Department of Philosophy at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill and a fourth-year student in the UNC School of Medicine. His research focuses on the relationships between justice, socioeconomic status, and health disparities.

Mia Wechsler Doron, MTS, MD, is an associate professor of pediatrics and adjunct associate professor of social medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. She is a neonatologist in UNC Hospitals' Newborn Critical Care Center and serves on the Hospitals' Reproductive Therapy Ethics Committee and Fetal Therapy Advisory Board. Dr. Doron's research focuses on applied ethics and medical decision making.

Senait Fisseha, MD, JD, is an assistant professor in reproductive endocrinology and infertility and the medical director of assisted reproductive technologies at the University of Michigan School of Medicine in Ann Arbor.

Lucy Frith is a lecturer in health care ethics in the Division of Primary Care at the University of Liverpool in England. She has published in the area of the ethical issues raised by reproductive technologies and the ethical implications of home and self-testing for HIV. Her research interests include reproductive technologies, especially gamete donor anonymity, empirical methods in bioethics, the ethical dimensions of HIV/AIDS, and the effectiveness of evidence-based-medicine in health care

David A. Gerber, MD, is an associate professor of surgery at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. He is director of the liver transplant program at the UNC Hospitals and a member of the scientific studies committee of the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

Catherine Green, MHS, is a third-year medical student at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. She has a master's degree in health science from Duke University and practiced as a physician assistant for 13 years before returning to school for her medical degree. Her future practice interests include obstetrics and gynecology, general internal medicine, and rheumatology.

Jennifer Hernandez, MD, is a fourth-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Her primary interest has been in clinical obstetrics and infectious diseases. She is currently pursuing a fellowship in maternal-fetal medicine.

Arun Jeyabalan, MD, MSCR, is an assistant professor in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at Magee-Womens Hospital at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. She is a physician-scientist with clinical and research interests in the arena of preeclampsia and vascular adaptations to pregnancy.

Kamalkumar P. Kolappa is a fourth-year medical student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His intended postgraduate training will be in plastic and reconstructive surgery. His clinical and research interests include pediatric craniofacial reconstruction as well as human rights and the ethics of global medicine.

Marta Kolthoff, MD, is an assistant professor in the Division of Reproductive Genetics, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Her areas of interest include reproductive ethics, genetics and ethics, and eugenics. She is a master's candidate in the bioethics program at the University of Pittsburgh. Her thesis will examine the ethical issues in preimplantation genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

Scott Roberts, MD, is an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. He is on the maternal-fetal medicine staff, and his primary interests are in clinical obstetrics, infectious diseases, and epidemiology.

Staff Contributor

Daniel Zank, MS, is a second-year medical student at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and interned during the summer of 2007 with the American Medical Association's Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago.

Theme Issue Editor

Dana Marie Roque, MD, is a resident in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at Magee-Womens Hospital, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. She earned her MD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2007 and graduated from Duke University in 2002 with a BS in chemistry. She has taught English at Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China and studied abroad at the University of Melbourne, Australia, and Universidad de Xochicalco, Mexico. In 2005-2006, she participated in research at the National Institutes of Health as a Cancer Research Training Award Fellow. She hopes to incorporate medical ethics and translational proteomics into her future practice.