AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. October 2009, Volume 11, Number 10: 826-828.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Religion, Patients, and Medical Ethics

Theme Issue Editor

Myrick C. Shinall , Jr., MD, MDiv,, is completing an internship in general surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and plans to continue training as a general surgeon. He graduated in 2009 with a medical degree from Vanderbilt Medical School and the master of divinity degree from Vanderbilt Divinity School in Nashville.

Contributors

Kevin Abbott is a second-year law student at DePaul University College of Law in Chicago, where he is on the staff of the DePaul Law Review and on the student board of directors of the Health Law Institute. His primary research interest is examining how courts interpret major life activities under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Mr. Abbott graduated from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, in 2007 with a bachelor’s degree in political science and a minor in chemistry.

Nabil Al-Khalisi, MD, works at the Iraq Medical City in Baghdad, and is a Nongovernmental Organization (NGO) activist. Dr. Al-Khalisi frequently writes about his medical experiences. His work has been published in the British Medical Journal, among others. He recently represented Iraq in the Global Changemakers programme run by the British Council.

Kyle B. Brothers, MD, is an instructor in the Department of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital and the Vanderbilt Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society in Nashville. He is also a student in the Graduate Department of Religion at Vanderbilt. His research focuses on clinical ethics, the ethics of genomic research, and the logic of clinical decision making.

Frank A Chervenak, MD, is Given Foundation Professor and chairman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Medical College of Cornell University in New York City. He has collaborated with Laurence B. McCullough on scholarship and teaching in the ethics of obstetrics and gynecology for over 26 years, and together they have published more than 140 papers in the peer-reviewed medical and bioethics literatures. He is coauthor with Laurence B. McCullough of Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Lisa Hermann, MD, is a senior resident in the Department of Neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. She graduated from the University of Virginia and has plans to pursue a fellowship in vascular neurology upon completion of residency.

Samuel E. Karff, DHL, is associate director of the John P. McGovern Center for Health, Humanities and the Human Spirit and visiting professor in family medicine at The University of Texas Medical School at Houston. His teaching focuses on the relational dimension of being a clinician/healer.

Laurence B. McCullough, PhD, holds the Dalton Tomlin Chair in Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston. He has collaborated with Frank A. Chervenak on scholarship and teaching in the ethics of obstetrics and gynecology for over 26 years, and together they have published more than 140 papers in the peer-reviewed medical and bioethics literatures. He is coauthor with Frank A. Chervenak of Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Keith G. Meador, MD, ThM, MPH, is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Center for Spirituality, Theology and Health at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.

Stephen G. Post, PhD, is director of the Center for Medical Humanities, Compassionate Care, and Bioethics of the Stony Brook University School of Medicine in Stony Brook, New York. He is the author of Why Good Things Happen to Good People and, from 1988 to 2008, he was professor of religion and bioethics at Case Western Reserve University. Dr. Post is also a trustee of the John Templeton Foundation.

Christina M. Puchalski, MD, MS, is an assistant professor in the Department of Medicine and Division of Geriatrics and director of clinical research and education at the Center to Improve Care of the Dying at George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, D.C. She also serves as a consultant with the National Institute for Healthcare Research as director of education, where she develops programs for undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate medical education on spirituality, end-of-life care, and cultural issues in medicine. Dr. Puchalski co-chaired a national education conference: Spirituality, Cross-Cultural Issues and End-of-Life Care: Curricular Development.

Everett R. Rhoades, MD, is professor emeritus of medicine at the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. A member of the Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma, Dr. Rhoades is a senior consultant to the Center for American Indian Health Research of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health and to the Strong Heart Study—a multicenter prospective study of cardiovascular disease and its associated risk factors among 13 Indian tribes. He is descended from a line of traditional healers and has personal experience with traditional Indian medicine. From 1982 to 1993, he served as the first American Indian director of the Indian Health Service.

Derek Riebau, MD, is an assistant professor in the stroke division of the Department of Neurology at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and completed his residency in neurology and a fellowship in vascular neurology at Vanderbilt University.

Richard P. Sloan, PhD, is the Nathaniel Wharton Professor of Behavioral Medicine, and chief of the Division of Behavioral Medicine at the New York State Psychiatric Institute in New York City. Dr. Sloan’s principal work focuses on identifying the autonomic nervous-system mechanisms that link psychological risk factors such as depression, hostility, and anxiety to heart disease.

John Tarpley, MD, is professor of surgery and program director of general surgery at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. He trained in general surgery at Johns Hopkins and has served on the faculties of the Baptist Medical Centre, Ogbomoso, Nigeria, and Johns Hopkins. His areas of interest include medical education, esophageal cancer, international health, history of medicine, and the role of spirituality in clinical medicine.

Margaret Tarpley, MLS, is senior associate in surgery in the Department of Surgery Education Office at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. A theological librarian for 15 years in Nigeria, her interests include surgery education, global health, and cultural competence/sensitivity as related to medicine and health care.

Robert J. Walter, MD, DHCE, is completing his residency in internal medicine at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, D.C. Prior to completing his medical degree at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, he received a doctorate in health care ethics from Duquesne University and currently serves as a member of the ethics committee at Walter Reed and as a teaching fellow at the Uniform Services University of the Health Sciences, providing instruction in medical ethics for the F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine.

Lynn D. Wardle, JD, is the Bruce C. Hafen Professor of Law at the J. Reuben Clark Law School at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He teaches and writes about biomedical ethics and law, as well as family law, origins of the Constitution, and other subjects. He is a member of the American Law Institute.