AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. December 2009, Volume 11, Number 12: 1016-1019.

Contributors

  • Print
  • |
  • View PDF

About the Contributors

Theme issue: HIV Care and Ethics

Theme Issue Editor

Melissa Gitman, MD, MPH, is a third-year resident in internal medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. She obtained her medical degree from McGill University in 2006 and her master’s degree in public health in 2009 from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Gitman plans to pursue fellowship training in infectious diseases at Mount Sinai Medical Center in July 2010.

Contributors

Divya Ahuja, MD, is an associate professor of medicine at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine, director of Midlands Care Consortium Clinic, and director of South Carolina HIV/AIDS Training Center in Columbia.

Bebe J. Anderson, JD, is the HIV project director at Lambda Legal in New York City. Prior to joining Lambda Legal in July 2006, she worked in a variety of legal positions in the public interest and private sectors, most recently as a staff attorney with the Center for Reproductive Rights. Ms. Anderson is a graduate of Columbia University School of Law and received a bachelor’s degree in biological sciences from the University of California at Santa Barbara.

Ronald Bayer, PhD, is a professor and co-chair in the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York City.

Bernard M. Branson, MD, is associate director for laboratory diagnostics in the Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention in the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Dr. Branson has provided HIV care, counseling, and testing for over 25 years, and was the lead author for the CDC’s “Revised Recommendations for HIV Testing of Adults, Adolescents, and Pregnant Women in Health-Care Settings,” issued in 2006.

R. Douglas Bruce, MD, MA, MSc, is an assistant professor of medicine at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and medical director of South Central Rehabilitation Center, an integrated health care center for substance users. Dr. Bruce’s research and clinical work are at the intersection of infectious diseases (particularly HIV and hepatitis C) and addiction, with the goal of improving health outcomes among substance users. He works with the Yale Bioethics Center and the Yale Institutional Review Board to address many of these ethical issues.

Charles S. Bryan, MD, is director of the Institute of Internal Medicine and Family Practice at Providence Hospitals, Columbia, South Carolina, and Heyward Gibbes Distinguished Professor of Internal Medicine Emeritus at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. His awards include the William Osler Medal of the American Association for the History of Medicine, the Theodore E. Woodward Award of the American Clinical and Climatological Association, and the Nicholas E. Davies Memorial Scholar Award of the American College of Physicians.

Donna Futterman, MD, is the director of the Adolescent AIDS Program, Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, New York, where she has worked since 1989. She is also a professor of clinical pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and has served as a national and international leader in HIV research and clinical care for adolescents.

Jay A. Jacobson, MD, is professor emeritus in the Department of Medical Ethics and Infectious Diseases at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Intermountain HealthCare in Salt Lake City.

May G. Kennedy, PhD, MPH, is an associate professor at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine in Richmond, where she teaches health communication in the MPH program and conducts applied prevention-communication research, particularly on entertainment education and social marketing. Prior to Fall 2005, Dr. Kennedy was a communication analyst in the Division of Health Communication of the Office of the Director of the CDC. There, she consulted on social marketing with CDC staff and national partners, helped evaluate the CDC’s Entertainment Education Program, and guest-edited a special issue of the Journal of Health Communication. Dr. Kennedy began her professional career as a member of the psychology faculty at Mercer University in Macon, Georgia, where she designed, conducted, and evaluated social skills-based preventive interventions for adolescents.

Seth M. Noar, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. He is a principal or co-investigator on several NIH- and CDC-funded projects that use traditional and new media to reduce sexual risk behaviors among African American and rural American populations. Dr. Noar co-edited Communication Perspectives on HIV/AIDS for the 21st Century.

Gerald M. Oppenheimer, PhD, MPH, is Broeklundian Professor at Brooklyn College and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York. He is a member of the Center for the History and Ethics of Public Health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York City.

Shilpa B. Rao, MD, is a second-year infectious disease fellow at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. He completed medical school training at the University of Tennessee, Memphis, and residency in internal medicine at Washington University in St. Louis. Dr. Rao plans a practice in clinical infectious diseases with a focus on public health.

Monica S. Ruiz, PhD, MPH, is an assistant research professor in the Department of Prevention and Community Health at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services in Washington, D.C. She is also the director of the HIV Prevention Research Program at the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research. Dr. Ruiz is a behavioral scientist whose career has focused almost exclusively on HIV prevention research. Her interests include addressing behavioral and policy issues pertaining to the development and implementation of non-vaccine HIV prevention strategies and examining the social and structural factors that impede HIV prevention efforts in vulnerable and disenfranchised populations.

Kristin E. Schleiter, JD, LLM, is a senior research associate for the Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs for the American Medical Association in Chicago. She analyzes ethics policy and law and assists in the development and dissemination of ethics policy and related educational material. Ms. Schleiter received both her law degree and master of law in health law from Loyola University Chicago School of Law, where she was a contributing writer for the Annals of Health Law.

Salaam Semaan, MPH, DrPH, is deputy associate director for science at the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Dr. Semaan has coauthored more than 65 articles and book chapters on prevention of HIV, STD, and viral hepatitis. Her primary research interests include the science and ethics of preventing bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections and the study of populations at risk for infection with HIV, STDs, and viral hepatitis. Dr. Semaan received her master’s degree in public health from the American University in Beirut and her doctorate in public health from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

William R. Short, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. Previously, he held an academic appointment at Drexel University College of Medicine and served as the director of HIV clinical services for the university. Dr. Short received his medical degree from Hahnemann University in 1997.

Sabra Smith, MS, RN, is a doctor of nursing practice (DNP) student at the University of South Carolina at Columbia. Her research interests include HIV care, rural health, and promoting advanced practice nursing. Ms. Smith’s DNP project, “Development of a Best Practice Guideline for HIV Management by Advanced Practice Nurses in Rural Settings,” combines these issues.

Hans M.L. Spiegel, MD, is medical director of the Adolescent AIDS Program at the Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx, New York. He has worked since 1985 in basic HIV research, clinical care, and advocacy for children and adolescents living with HIV.

Natalie Stein, MD, is a resident in internal medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia.