AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. March 2010, Volume 12, Number 3: 248-252.

Contributors

  • Print
  • |
  • View PDF

About the Contributors

Theme issue: Global Health Ethics in Practice

Theme Issue Editor

Jennifer L. Weinberg is an MD/master of bioethics dual-degree candidate at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and will complete both degrees by May 2010. She has traveled to Botswana, Thailand, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Turkey, and Croatia to participate in international health outreach efforts and community service projects. She has also dedicated time to studying and improving the reach of teledermatology for resource-limited settings. Weinberg hopes to integrate her interests in international health, bioethics, and public health in her career.

Contributors

Kym Ahrens, MD, MPH, is an acting instructor and senior research fellow in the Adolescent Medicine Division of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Hana Akselrod is a second-year MD/MPH student at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York and current editor in chief of Global Pulse, the international health journal of the American Medical Student Association. She graduated from Brandeis University in 2007 with a BS in biochemistry and a minor in anthropology and was a research intern for Partners In Health before starting medical school. Her professional interests include internal medicine, environmental health, underserved communities, and human rights.

Maneesh Batra, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Division of Neonatology of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington and Seattle Children’s Hospital and associate director of the pediatric residency program.

Lisa Benrud, PhD, JD, is an associate in the health law practice group of Halleland Lewis Nilan & Johnson in Minneapolis. She counsels providers and managed care plans about Medicare and Medicaid compliance and contracting issues. Prior to attending law school, Benrud spent several years as a clinical psychologist and clinical researcher in large health systems. She received her BA from Luther College, her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and her JD from the University of Minnesota.

Jennifer Cohn, MD, is an instructor in internal medicine and director of the medicine residency program’s Global Health Track at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She has consulted for the World Health Organization and is on the steering committee of Health GAP. Her research interests are in health workforce and U.S. policy affecting access to HIV medication in low-income countries. Her clinical practice is in infectious diseases at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and at Mbagathi District Hospital, Kenya, where she lives part-time.

Jacqueline Darrah, JD, MA, is a shareholder at Halleland Lewis Nilan & Johnson in Minneapolis, providing legal and compliance advice to all types of health care organizations, including health plans, hospitals, clinics, physician groups, and start-up companies. She has expertise in HIPAA, Medicare compliance, the Stark and anti-kickback laws, nonprofit organizations, and county-based health plans. She represents clients in compliance matters, creation and development of new businesses, and other general counsel concerns. Darrah received her legal degree from the Loyola School of Law in Chicago, her master’s in health care administration from the University of Illinois-Springfield, and her undergraduate degree from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana.

C. Jessica Dine, MD, MSHPR, is an assistant professor of medicine and an associate program director for the internal medicine residency program at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Her interests include the use of process and outcome measurement in assessing areas of medical education, supervision of trainees, and physician leadership.

Fred Donini-Lenhoff, MA, is director of medical education products at the American Medical Association in Chicago.

Mei Elansary, MPhil, is an Egyptian American medical student at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Following graduation from the University of Pennsylvania, Mei worked for the Population Council in Egypt, where she focused on educational interventions for rural, out-of-school girls. She then pursued an MPhil in medical anthropology at Oxford. As a Wilbur G. Downs International Research Fellow at Yale, she completed a project on health care utilization and illness beliefs in West Kalimantan, Indonesia, and has assisted in the development of the global health curriculum at Yale.

Harvey M. Friedman, MD, is professor of medicine and chief of infectious diseases at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, the director of the Botswana-UPenn Partnership, and a bench scientist who works on herpes simplex virus pathogenesis and vaccine development. He spends 6 to 12 weeks a year in Botswana, meeting with ministry of health leadership, University of Botswana faculty, and Botswana-UPenn Partnership faculty and staff to develop the clinical, education, and research missions of the partnership.

Lauren K. Graber is a third-year medical student at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. Graber received a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship in 2004 to investigate communication in refugee health centers in several different countries and returned to the U.S. in 2005 to work in refugee resettlement. After entering medical school, she was awarded a Wilbur G. Downs International Research Fellowship to study the incidence of lead poisoning in children in Kampala, Uganda. Graber has assisted in the development of the medical student global health curriculum at Yale.

Cynthia Haq, MD, is professor of family medicine and director of the University of Wisconsin Center for Global Health in Madison. She has lived and worked in Pakistan Uganda and served as a medical education consultant in many other countries. She also leads the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health program on Training in Urban Medicine and Public Health in Milwaukee.

Alison Johnson, RN, MBA, is part of Halleland Health Consulting, Inc., in Minneapolis. Her practice includes medical management strategies and community plans for vulnerable populations. Her nursing degree is from the University of Washington, she earned her MBA at Western Washington University, and she is currently a doctoral student in psychiatric nursing at the University of Minnesota. Her research interests include health care reform and behavioral health issues.

Kaveh Khoshnood, PhD, is an assistant professor in public health practice at the Yale School of Public Health in New Haven, Connecticut, and chair of the university’s committee on international health. Dr. Khoshnood is an infectious diseases epidemiologist whose interests include the examination of the links between health and human rights, the role of health in international relations, and the ethical dilemmas in research involving vulnerable populations.

Carrie L. Kovarik, MD, is an assistant professor of dermatology, dermatopathology, and infectious diseases at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Kovarik has a special interest in tropical, infectious, and HIV-related dermatology. She is head of dermatology for the Botswana-UPenn Partnership and is the primary dermatology consultant for the Baylor International Pediatric AIDS Initiative (BIPAI) in Africa. Dr. Kovarik has created an African teledermatology consult service (africa.telederm.org) that is a collaborative effort between BIPAI, the American Academy of Dermatology, 12 African countries, and several other institutions. Dr. Kovarik has started an initiative in global health at the University of Pennsylvania, and she is the director of the Penn Dermatology Global Health program.

Heather Lukolyo, MHS, is a first-year medical student at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison. She holds a graduate degree in public health and has worked extensively in Uganda as well as with underserved populations in Baltimore and Minneapolis and with American Indian populations in rural Wisconsin.

Sarah Lyon, MD, is a pulmonary and critical care fellow at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. As a resident she worked at Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana, through the Botswana-UPenn Partnership. After completing her residency in internal medicine, Dr. Lyon returned to Botswana as an instructor with the partnership, working as an attending physician at Princess Marina Hospital and carrying out clinical and educational outreach to remote district hospitals.

Mosepele Mosepele, MD, is a first-year internal medicine resident at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He completed his medical education at the University of Melbourne, Australia, including a six-month exchange program at the University of Oslo, Norway. His interests include the delivery of national HIV care programs, HIV clinical research, and the development of medical education in sub-Saharan Africa.

Sujal M. Parikh is a third-year medical student at the University of Michigan Medical School. He serves on the internal advisory council for the University of Michigan Center for Global Health, the student advisory committee for the Global Health Education Consortium, the student advisory board for Physicians for Human Rights, and the board of trustees for the Uganda Village Project. Parikh hopes to pursue a career that spans education, research, advocacy, and clinical practice.

Phil Perry, MSJ, is a research assistant in the ethics group at the American Medical Association in Chicago and assistant editor of Virtual Mentor.

Jane Philpott, MD, is chief of family medicine at Markham Stouffville Hospital and assistant professor in the University of Toronto’s Department of Family & Community Medicine. Dr. Philpott is lead physician at a new family medicine teaching unit in Markham that offers a longitudinal focus on global and intercultural health. She serves on the planning committee of the Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration (TAAAC), consulting on family medicine residency training in Ethiopia. She practiced general medicine and developed a community health training program in West Africa from 1989 to 1998 and is the founding chair of Give a Day to World AIDS, which has raised more than Can$2 million for those affected by HIV in Africa.

Audrey M. Provenzano is a fourth-year medical student at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and is currently associate director of the HAVEN Free Clinic. She plans to pursue training in general internal medicine. Her research interests include health inequality, equitable health care access, and women’s health.

Asghar Rastegar, MD, is a professor of medicine at the Yale School of Medicine and director of the international health program. Dr. Rastegar is a nephrologist whose interests include residency training, capacity building in resource-poor settings, the development of bilateral interinstitutional collaboration in medical education, and training nephrologists for resource-poor environments worldwide.

Josh Ruxin, PhD, MPH, is assistant clinical professor of public health at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University in New York. He resides in Rwanda, where he directs the Access Project, which focuses on health care management, and Rwanda Works, an organization dedicated to prosperity creation.

F. Bruder Stapleton, MD, is Ford/Morgan Professor and chair of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington in Seattle. He is also associate dean of the School of Medicine and the chief academic officer at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

Claire L. Wendland, MD, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Departments of Anthropology, Obstetrics & Gynecology, and Medical History & Bioethics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Dr.Wendland practiced obstetrics and gynecology on the Navajo reservation for over a decade before turning to medical anthropology. Her ongoing research focuses on the spread of medical expertise and ways of thinking in African settings.