AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. August 2012, Volume 14, Number 8: 679-681.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Personalized Medicine

Theme Issue Editor

Byram H. Ozer, MD, PhD, is a second-year resident in neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles. He received his MD and PhD degrees from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and completed his internship in internal medicine at Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Contributors

Jeffrey R. Botkin, MD, MPH, is a professor of pediatrics and medical ethics and associate vice president for research at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City.

Murray H. Brilliant, PhD, is the director of the Center for Human Genetics at the Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation and the principal investigator for the Personalized Medicine Research Project in Marshfield, Wisconsin. Dr. Brilliant conducts research on complex human genetic disorders.

Shawneequa Callier, JD, MA, is an assistant professor in the Department of Clinical Research and Leadership at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, D.C.

Timothy Chang is a MD-PhD student at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. His research focus is in translational biomedical informatics, particularly in prediction of disease, prognosis, and treatment response, which he hopes to apply to personalized medicine.

Wendy Foth is a research coordinator with the Center for Human Genetics at the Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation in Marshfield, Wisconsin.

Joan H. Fujimura, PhD, is a professor of sociology and professor of science and technology studies in the Robert F. and Jean E. Holtz Center at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Dr. Fujimura studies the social and ethical aspects of genetics, molecular biology, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Her research has been supported by NIH’s National Human Genome Research Institute, the National Science Foundation, and the University of Wisconsin Graduate School.

Geoffrey S. Ginsburg, MD, PhD, is the founding director for genomic medicine at the Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, the founding executive director of the Center for Personalized Medicine, and a professor of medicine and pathology at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.

Dov Greenbaum, JD, PhD, is an assistant (adjunct) professor of molecular biophysics and biochemistry at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, a nonresident fellow at the Center for Law and the Biosciences at Stanford University Law School in Palo Alto, California, and an attorney at Pearl Cohen Zedek Latzer in Israel.

Susanne B. Haga, PhD, is an associate research professor at the Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy and Sanford School of Public Policy and the director of education and training at the Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy, all at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. She received a PhD in human genetics from the University of Maryland. Her research interests focus on the translation of genomic medicine, particularly pharmacogenetics, and the legal, regulatory, ethical, educational, and social implications of genomic research and applications.

Bruce Korf, MD, PhD, is a medical geneticist who is board certified in pediatrics, child neurology, medical genetics, clinical cytogenetics, and clinical molecular genetics. He is the Wayne H. and Sara Crews Finley Professor of Medical Genetics, chair of the Department of Genetics, and director of the Heflin Center for Genomic Sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. He is immediate past president of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and president of the ACMG Foundation for Genetic and Genomic Medicine.

Aaron M. Lowe, PhD, completed his doctoral studies in the laboratory of Nicholas L. Abbott, PhD, and Paul J. Bertics, PhD, with a focus on the detection of biomolecules through novel techniques.

John Mahoney, MD, is associate dean for medical education and an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Pennsylvania. His academic interests focus on innovation in medical student education and on improving the connections between students, faculty, and patients.

Rachel A. Mills, MS, is a clinical research coordinator and certified genetic counselor at the Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. She received her MS in genetic counseling from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Her primary research interests include public and professional genetics education and the use of genomics in health care.

Ramya Rajagopalan, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin - Madison and an ethics fellow at the Morgridge Institute for Research. Dr. Rajagopalan (with Joan H. Fujimura, PhD) studies the social, ethical, and clinical impacts of genetics, biomedicine, and biotechnology.

Rachel Simpson is a graduate student pursuing a master of public health degree in epidemiology at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Sciences in Washington, D.C. She received a bachelor of science degree in cognitive science with a specialization in neuroscience from the University of California, San Diego.

Sara Wainscott has an MFA in poetry from the University of Washington. She lives in Chicago and teaches writing at Columbia College. Her poems have appeared most recently in Requited, Columbia Poetry Review, The Journal, and Poetry Northwest.

Carol Waudby is a research coordinator with the Center for Human Genetics at the Marshfield Clinic Research Foundation in Marshfield, Wisconsin.