AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Virtual Mentor. September 2013, Volume 15, Number 9: 820-823.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Motherhood and Medicine

Theme Issue Editor

Colleen Farrell is a second-year medical student at Harvard Medical School in Boston. She received her BA in women’s and gender studies from Williams College in 2010 and worked as a research assistant at The Hastings Center, a nonprofit bioethics research institute, from 2010 to 2012. Her research interests in the fields of history of medicine and bioethics include HIV/AIDS, feminism, and medical education.

Contributors

Nancy Berlinger, PhD, is a research scholar at The Hastings Center in Garrison, New York, where she co-directs the Undocumented Patients project www.undocumentedpatients.org. She is an author of the new edition of The Hastings Center Guidelines for Decisions on Life-Sustaining Treatment and Care Near the End of Life (Oxford University Press, 2013). She is collaborating with researchers at the Centre for Biomedical Ethics of Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore, The Hastings Center, and The Ethox Centre at the University of Oxford to develop a web-based medical ethics casebook for health care professionals in Asia, with attention to migrant workers as caregivers and as patients.

Sidney Callahan, PhD, is a psychologist and distinguished scholar at The Hastings Center, a pioneering bioethics center in Garrison, New York. She is the author of numerous articles and eleven books, including In Good Conscience: Reason and Emotion in Moral Decision Making and Created for Joy: A Christian Experience of Suffering. She received her BA in English from Bryn Mawr College, her MA in psychology from Sarah Lawrence College, and a PhD in social and personality psychology from the City University of New York.

Jennifer G. Clarke, MD, MPH, is a physician at the Rhode Island women’s prison, associate professor of medicine and obstetrics/gynecology at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, and the director of health disparities research at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island. Her areas of expertise include women’s health, motivational interviewing to improve reproductive health outcomes, and health care delivery for incarcerated populations.

Alice Dreger, PhD, is a professor of clinical medical humanities and bioethics at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and a writer for the health section of The Atlantic. Her scholarship focuses on scientific controversies, human sexuality, and the medical treatment of people whose bodies and behaviors challenge dominant social norms.

Ruth R. Faden, PhD, MPH, is the Philip Franklin Wagley Professor of Biomedical Ethics and founding director of the Berman Institute of Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. Dr. Faden is co-author of Social Justice: The Moral Foundations of Public Health and Health Policy and A History and Theory of Informed Consent and a co-editor of AIDS, Women and the Next Generation and HIV, AIDS and Childbearing: Public Policy, Private Lives. She is also a co-founder of the Hinxton Group, a global community committed to advancing ethical and policy challenges in stem cell science, and the Second Wave project, an effort to ensure that the health interests of pregnant women are fairly represented in biomedical research and drug and device policies.

Autumn Fiester, PhD, is the director of education in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She is the director of the Penn Clinical Ethics Mediation Program and co-director of the Bioethics, Sexuality, and Gender Identity Project.

Anne F. Gross, MD, is the associate psychiatry residency training director and an associate professor and inpatient psychiatrist in the Department of Psychiatry at Oregon Health and Science University. Following medical school at Emory University, Dr. Gross completed her psychiatry residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital Adult Psychiatry Residency Training program and fellowship training at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Gross’s interests include medical student and resident education and psychosomatic medicine.

Kristen Hessler, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy at the University at Albany, State University of New York. She received her PhD from the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on political philosophy (especially issues in global justice, human rights, and international law) and bioethics (with a focus on environmental and agricultural issues). She teaches ethics, applied ethics, political philosophy, and feminist philosophy.

Josephine Johnston, LLB, MBHL, is director of research and a research scholar at The Hastings Center, an independent bioethics research institute in Garrison, New York. She has degrees in law and bioethics from the University of Otago, New Zealand. She works on a range of ethical, legal, and policy issues in science and medicine, including reproduction and parenting, psychiatry and neuroscience, and the conduct of biomedical research. She is also developing a bioethics research program for high school students.

Rebecca Kaebnick was a summer research assistant at The Hastings Center in 2013. She studies sociology at Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York.

Anne Drapkin Lyerly, MD, MA, is associate director of the Center for Bioethics and an associate professor of social medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of A Good Birth: Finding the Positive and Profound in Your Childbirth Experience and co-founder of the Second Wave Initiative, an effort to ensure that the health interests of pregnant women are fairly represented in biomedical research and drug and device policies.

Jessica Martucci, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of History at Mississippi State University, where she offers courses in the history of science, technology, medicine, women’s history, and gender studies. Her doctorate in the history and sociology of science is from the University of Pennsylvania. Her first book, Back to the Breast: Natural Motherhood and Breastfeeding in the 20th Century (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming) traces the resurgence in the practice of breastfeeding in America alongside shifting scientific and cultural ideologies of motherhood and family.

Yesenia M. Perez is a summer intern for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs and a student at DePaul College of Law in Chicago. Ms. Perez completed her undergraduate degree at Rutgers University in biological sciences and Spanish linguistics. She will complete her law degree and certificate in health law in 2015.

Benjamin C. Silverman, MD, is vice chair of a McLean Hospital institutional review board panel and an instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School in Boston. Following undergraduate and medical school education at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Silverman completed residency and fellowship training at the Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital Adult Psychiatry Residency Training program, Partners Health Care System, and the Division of Medical Ethics at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Silverman’s interests include innovative and technology-based treatments for addictions and ethical questions about clinicians’ use of emerging information technologies and social media within the medical encounter.

Rachel E. Simon is a second-year medical student at Harvard Medical School in Boston. She graduated with an ScB in human biology from Brown University in 2011, where she wrote her undergraduate thesis on the cognitive and affective response to incarceration for substance-using women. Her interests include drug policy and incarceration, women’s health, and health care disparities.

Aron C. Sousa, MD, is senior associate dean for academic affairs and an associate professor of medicine at Michigan State University’s College of Human Medicine. His scholarly interests include evidence-based medicine and outcomes-based medical education.

Kate Treadway, MD, is the Gerald S. Foster Academy Associate Professor of Medicine, the Mark and Susan Lawrence Director of Professionalism, director of the Introduction to the Profession course for incoming medical and dental students, and an associate master of the Walter B. Cannon Society—a role that includes mentoring students—at Harvard Medical School in Boston. She is a primary care physician at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Lance Wahlert, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the Perelman School of Medicine and a core faculty member in the Department of Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. He is the director of the Bioethics, Sexuality, and Gender Identity Project.