AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. October 2015, Volume 17, Number 10: 1002-1005.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Physicians, Human Rights, and Civil Liberties

Theme Issue Editor

Nikhil A. Patel, MS, is a fourth-year medical student at the Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minnesota, who plans to pursue a career in psychiatry. He recently completed the requirements for an MPH in global health with interdisciplinary concentrations in public health leadership and in humanitarian studies, ethics, and human rights at the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University. He hopes to build on his bi-disciplinary training and on his experience working with refugees in the US and at the Thai-Burma border by developing and scaling models of mental health care delivery for vulnerable populations, locally and globally.

Contributors

Stephanie Bi attends the University of Chicago, where she is majoring in biological sciences and English language and literature. In the summer of 2015, she was an Ethics Group intern at the American Medical Association. Stephanie is interested in health policy and aspires to become a physician-writer.

J. Wesley Boyd, MD, PhD, is a part-time assistant professor of psychiatry and a member of the Center for Bioethics faculty at Harvard Medical School in Boston. He is also a staff psychiatrist at Cambridge Health Alliance, where he is the co-founder and co-director of the Human Rights and Asylum Clinic. Dr. Boyd writes for lay and academic audiences on issues of health care justice and humanist aspects of medicine. His book, Almost Addicted (Hazelden, 2012), won the New England American Medical Writers Association’s Will Solemine Award for Excellence in Medical Writing.

Dominic Caruso is a fourth-year medical student at the Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minnesota. He recently completed work for a master’s of public health degree with a concentration in health policy from the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University. He plans to pursue postgraduate training in family medicine. Dominic’s academic interests include Medicaid and Medicare policy, primary health care, and the effect of health policy on marginalized and low-income populations.

Andrea S. Christopher, MD, is a research fellow in general internal medicine at Harvard Medical School and Cambridge Health Alliance in Boston. She received her MD from the University of Washington School of Medicine and her postgraduate training in internal medicine from the University of Washington. Dr. Christopher’s research focuses on disparities in access to health care for vulnerable populations, specifically the financial burden of out-of-pocket health care costs, and the impact of health insurance on chronic disease management.

Douglas Diekema, MD, MPH, is director of education at the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics at Seattle Children’s Hospital. He serves on the Ethics Committee of the American Board of Pediatrics and is a past chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Bioethics. His research interests include pediatric bioethics and pediatric wilderness medicine.

G. David Elkin, MD, is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco, where he co-leads the coordination of clinical psychiatry rotations and leads seminars on psychiatric assessment, critical thinking, and medical humanities. He completed his MD at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine and a residency in internal medicine and psychiatry at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Elkin is the editor of Introduction to Clinical Psychiatry (Lange, 1999) and an upcoming book chapter on medical ethics.

Aimee M. Grace, MD, MPH, is the health legislative assistant for Senator Brian Schatz (D-HI) and an adjunct assistant professor of pediatrics at The George Washington University in Washington, DC. Dr. Grace was previously a Children’s National Health System General Academic Pediatrics fellow in association with the Division of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where she studied pediatric benefits in the Affordable Care Act. She received her MD from the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine, her residency training in pediatrics at Stanford University, and her MPH from the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University.

Sharon Kling, MBChB, MMed, MPhil, is the clinical unit head for general pediatrics and an associate professor in the Department of Paediatrics and Child Health of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Stellenbosch University in Cape Town, South Africa, where she is also a part-time lecturer in the Centre for Medical Ethics and Law. Her areas of interest are clinical and pediatric ethics, allergy, and asthma.

Tobin Klusty is pursuing a JD at DePaul University College of Law in Chicago. In the summer of 2015, Tobin was the DePaul University Health Law Scholar at the American Medical Association. His research focuses on the intersection of health law and civil rights, and he also has an interest in public policy.

Amos Lichtman, MPH, recently completed a master’s of public health with an interdisciplinary concentration in humanitarian studies, ethics, and human rights at the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University in Boston and is in his final year of medical school at the University of Massachusetts in Worcester.

Nicole Littenberg, MD, MPH, practices internal medicine at Kokua Kalihi Valley Comprehensive Family Services and serves as the clinical director of the High Risk Victim Clinic at the Sex Abuse Treatment Center in Honolulu. In 2007 she co-founded the nonprofit Pacific Survivor Center to provide forensic evaluations, health care, and social services for victims of human trafficking, torture, and immigrant domestic violence. Over the past decade, Dr. Littenberg has provided care to hundreds of survivors and has conducted trainings on the investigation, documentation, and treatment of torture and trafficking victims for health care providers, attorneys, and judges in Hawaii and internationally. She is researching the health needs and access to care of labor trafficking survivors in Hawaii.

Steven H. Miles, MD, is a professor of medicine and bioethics and holds the Maas Family Endowed Chair in Bioethics at the University of Minnesota Medical School in Minneapolis. He has served as president of the American Society of Bioethics and Humanities and received its Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Miles has published extensively on medical ethics, human rights, tropical medicine, and end-of-life care. He is the author of The Hippocratic Oath and the Ethics of Medicine (Oxford University Press, 2005), Oath Betrayed: America’s Torture Doctors (University of California Press, 2009), and Doctors Who Torture: The Pursuit of Justice (2015).

Keymanthri Moodley, MBChB, MFam Med, DPhil, is the director of the Centre for Medical Ethics and Law and a professor in the Department of Internal Medicine of the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences at Stellenbosch University in Cape Town, South Africa. Her research interests include biobanking, HIV and ethics, and neuroethics, and she has a strong interest in the constraints facing women in academia.

Mohit Nair is a second-year master’s student in the T.H. Chan School of Public Health at Harvard University in Boston where he is completing the interdisciplinary concentration in humanitarian studies, ethics, and human rights. His research focuses on persons with disabilities and other vulnerable populations in conflict.

Wendy Orr, MBChB, is head of Group Inclusion Strategies for the Standard Bank Group in Johannesburg, South Africa. She qualified as a physician at the University of Cape Town in 1983, and, while working as a medical officer in the office of the district surgeon in Port Elizabeth in 1985, became the first and only doctor employed by the government to reveal police torture and abuse of detainees when she successfully sought a Supreme Court interdict to halt the abuse. She served on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa from 1996 to 1998.

Judith Palfrey, MD, is the T. Berry Brazelton Professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical School in Boston and a senior associate in medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital. A general pediatrician, she focuses on community medicine and advocacy, especially for children and adolescents with disabilities. She is the past president of both the Academic Pediatric Association and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Hanni Stoklosa, MD, MPH, is an emergency physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, an instructor at Harvard Medical School, and a Human Trafficking and Forced Labor fellow at the T.H. Chan School of Public Health Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University in Boston. She is also an Institute of Medicine, American Board of Emergency Medicine fellow in health sciences policy and co-founder of HEAL (Health, Education, Advocacy, Linkages) Trafficking, an international network of professionals combating human trafficking from a public health perspective. Her work seeks to advance research and policy on the health needs of human trafficking victims, globally and locally.

Aaron Wightman, MD, MA, is a bioethicist and pediatric nephrologist at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison. His research focuses on decision making for children with complex, chronic medical conditions.

White Coats for Black Lives (WC4BL) is a national medical student organization devoted to safeguarding the lives of patients through the elimination of racism. The WC4BL National Working Group endeavors to raise awareness of racism as a public health concern that threatens the lives and health of people of color, end racial discrimination in the delivery of health care, and prepare future physicians to be advocates for racial justice. WC4BL encourages medical professionals to create a physician workforce that reflects the diversity of our nation by actively recruiting and supporting Black, Latino, and Native American people through medical school and into their careers.