AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. March 2016, Volume 18, Number 3: 347-352.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Bed to Bench: Medicine and the Law

Theme Issue Editor

Arina Evgenievna Chesnokova, MPH, is a third-year medical student at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Arina completed her masters of public health degree at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2011, where she developed a special interest in health law and public health ethics. Subsequently, she worked as a researcher at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia PolicyLab. Her scholarly interests include reproductive health law and policy and geospatial components of health disparities.

Contributors

Lisa Campo-Engelstein, PhD, is an associate professor at the Alden March Bioethics Institute of Albany Medical College in Albany, New York, and the co-editor of Oncofertility: Ethical, Legal, Social, and Medical Perspectives (Springer, 2010). A bioethicist specializing in reproductive and sexual ethics and gender theory, she has been published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Science, The Hastings Center Report, and The American Journal of Bioethics. She earned her PhD in philosophy from Michigan State University and completed a postdoctoral fellowship with the Oncofertility Consortium at Northwestern University.

Douglas Carlson, JD, practices law in Illinois, with offices in Chicago, and is the long-standing counsel of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). He is interested in accreditation law, including its interaction with antitrust law.

Frank A. Chervenak, MD, is the Given Foundation Professor and chair of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City. He is writing (with Laurence B. McCullough and John H. Coverdale) a book titled Professional Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

John H. Coverdale, MD, MEd, is a professor of psychiatry and behavior sciences in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He is writing (with Frank A. Chervenak and Laurence B. McCullough) a book titled Professional Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Sasha Davenport is a senior research fellow at the Initiative for Neuroscience and Law at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, where she researches neurocognitive risk assessment testing methods and predictive criminal recidivism models. A Ronald E. McNair Scholar with a BA in forensic psychology from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, her work on neuropsychology and warfare has been presented at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Barry DeCoster, PhD, is an assistant professor of philosophy and bioethics in the Humanities and Communication Department at the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Science in Albany, New York. His research focuses on problems in health care ethics and the philosophy of science and medicine, including bioethical critiques of medicalization, LGBT health, and virtue ethics (with a focus on collaboration and political resistance).

Greg Dolin, MD, JD, is co-director of the University of Baltimore’s Center for Medicine and Law, where he is also an associate professor of law. His scholarship centers on patent law and, in particular, on how the patent regime affects innovation in bio-pharmaceutical areas, and has led to a number of scholarly articles, presentations, amicus briefs, and Congressional testimony.

David Eagleman, PhD, is a neuroscientist at the Baylor College of Medicine and the founder and director of the Center for Science and Law in Houston, Texas. He is also the creator and host of PBS’s The Brain and the author of Incognito: The Secret Lives of the Brain (Pantheon, 2011). His areas of research include plasticity, time perception, vision, synesthesia, and the intersection of neuroscience with the legal system.

Abigail English, JD, is the director and founder of the Center for Adolescent Health and the Law in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. A lawyer, researcher, and advocate for the rights of vulnerable young people, her research and advocacy focus on health insurance and public financing of care for adolescents and young adults, consent and confidentiality protections, and sexual and reproductive health care.

Hilary E. Fairbrother, MD, MPH, is the associate director of undergraduate medical education and the co-clerkship director of the Emergency Medicine Selective for the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Emergency Medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. She specializes in health care policy, ethics, and simulation education.

Christi J. Guerrini, JD, is a research instructor at the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, and a graduate student at University of Texas School of Public Health. Her research focuses on health privacy, human research subject protections, and the intersection of intellectual property law and genomics.

Gabe Haarsma, PhD, is a postdoctoral programmer at the Center for Science and Law in Houston, Texas, where he spearheads big data analysis of millions of crime records to analyze and visualize patterns of crime and recidivism.

Howard Henderson, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of the Administration of Justice at Texas Southern University in Houston, Texas, where he also serves as the director of the graduate program. His research examines the psychometric properties of offender behavioral risk needs assessment.

Anna Jarman is a research fellow at the Center for Science and Law and an analyst with Shell Technology Ventures in Houston, Texas. She studied psychology and cognitive science at Rice University and has worked in public policy and research for over five years.

Joseph S. Kass, MD, JD, is an associate professor of neurology, psychiatry, and medical ethics at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, where he also serves as the assistant dean of students and the vice chair for education in the Department of Neurology. He is the chief of neurology at Ben Taub General Hospital.

Christine Khaikin, JD, is the advocacy coordinator at the MergerWatch Project in New York City.

Kelly A. Kyanko, MD, MHS, is an assistant professor of population health and medicine at New York University School of Medicine and a primary care physician at Bellevue Hospital Center in New York City. Her research focuses on primary care transformation and use of out-of-network care in private insurance plans.

Julie Lewis, MPH, is a public health and policy expert at the National Family Planning and Reproductive Health Association in Washington, DC, where she directs the Confidential and Covered, a multi-year research project investigating how Title X-funded family planning providers can maintain patient confidentiality while mitigating revenue loss.

Mary Anderlik Majumder, JD, PhD, is an associate professor of medicine at the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. Her research focuses on the ethical and social implications of new genomic technologies and ethical and policy questions related to problems of cost, quality, and access in health care.

Laurence B. McCullough, PhD, holds the Dalton Tomlin Chair in Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He is writing (with Frank A. Chervenak and John H. Coverdale) a book titled Professional Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

Thomas J. Nasca, MD, is the chief executive officer of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), a professor of medicine at Sidney Kimmel Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, and a senior scholar in the Department of Education at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago. A career-long educator, investigator, and educational administrator who is board certified in internal medicine and nephrology, Dr. Nasca is interested in the ethical basis of the relationship between medicine and society, especially as it applies to medical education.

Pablo A. Ormachea, JD, is a postdoctoral fellow at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He also serves as co-director of the Center for Science and Law, where he manages several data-driven projects sharing the goal of constructing a cost-effective legal system with higher utility and lower cost. He holds a JD from Harvard Law School.

Brendan Parent, JD, is the director of applied bioethics at New York University School of Professional Studies and a faculty affiliate of the Division of Medical Ethics at New York University Langone Medical Center in New York City. Previously, he was special legal advisor to the New York Task Force on Life and the Law. His research focuses on ethical issues in vascularized composite allograft transplants and in genetics technologies.

Natalie Ram, JD, is an assistant professor of law at the University of Baltimore School of Law and the associate director of the law school’s Center for Medicine and Law. Professor Ram received her JD degree from the Yale Law School and her AB degree from Princeton University, and she previously clerked for Supreme Court Justice Stephen G. Breyer and for Judge Guido Calabresi of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. She writes about matters at the intersection of bioethics and the law and has been published in Harvard Law Review, Columbia Law Review, Stanford Law Review, and other law journals.

Rachel V. Rose, JD, MBA, is a principal with Rachel V. Rose—Attorney at Law, PLLC, and teaches bioethics in Baylor College of Medicine’s Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy in Houston, Texas. She is co-editor (with Roberta L. Carroll and Peggy Nakamura) of the second edition of Enterprise Risk Management Handbook for Healthcare Entities (American Health Lawyers Association, 2013) and co-author (with Raymund C. King) of The ABCs of ACOs: A Practical Handbook on Accountable Care Organizations (American Bar Association, 2015) and (with Jonathan P. Tomes) What Are…International HIPAA Considerations? (American Bar Association, 2015).

Jeff Sconyers, JD, is a senior lecturer in the Department of Health Services in the School of Public Health and an adjunct member of the faculty of the School of Law at the University of Washington in Seattle. He serves on the ethics committees of Seattle Children’s Hospital and Swedish Medical Center First Hill, served as the first General Counsel at Seattle Children’s Hospital, and is a past president of the Washington State Society of Health Care Attorneys and former member of the Board of Directors of the American Health Lawyers Association. A frequent speaker on legal ethics, and public health law and practice, he is also founding co-editor-in-chief of the Washington Health Law Manual and co-author of “Pediatric Risk Management” in Risk Management Handbook for Health Care Organizations (Jossey-Bass, 2009).

Nicolle K. Strand, JD, MBioethics, is a senior policy and research analyst at the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues in Washington, DC. She is a graduate of Wellesley College and the University of Pennsylvania School of Law and received her masters of bioethics degree from the University of Pennsylvania. She has conducted work, both independently and for the Bioethics Commission, on genetic privacy, incidental findings, and neuroscience ethics and policy.

Tyler Tate, MD, is a fellow in pediatric bioethics at the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics at Seattle Children’s Hospital and the Division of Bioethics in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle. He is also a practicing pediatrician in the University of Washington Division of General Pediatrics and Hospital Medicine. He is pursuing a master’s degree in bioethics and is broadly interested in the intersection of theology and medicine, the ethics of suffering, value judgments in health care, the medical humanities, and global health.

Jun-Chieh James Tsay, MD, MSc, is an instructor of medicine in the Department of Medicine within the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. Dr. Tsay’s current research interest is pulmonary diseases, specifically early stage lung cancer biomarkers.

Lois Uttley, MPP, is the founder and director of the MergerWatch Project and is on the faculty in the health advocacy master’s program at Sarah Lawrence College in New York City. Formerly the director of public affairs for the New York State Department of Health, she has also served as president of the Public Health Association of New York City.

Richard Weinmeyer, JD, MA, MPhil, is a senior research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Mr. Weinmeyer received his master’s degree in bioethics and his law degree with a concentration in health law and bioethics from the University of Minnesota, where he served as editor in chief for volume 31 of Law and Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice. He obtained his first master’s degree in sociology from Cambridge University. Previously, Mr. Weinmeyer served as a project coordinator at the University of Minnesota Division of Epidemiology and Community Health. His research interests are in public health law, bioethics, and biomedical research regulation.

Katherine Yun, MD, MHS, is an assistant professor of pediatrics at the PolicyLab at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Yun’s research focuses on health system navigation by Bhutanese and Latino immigrant families in Philadelphia.