AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. April 2016, Volume 18, Number 4: 469-472.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Disability, Ethics, and Medicine

Theme Issue Editor

Emily Johnson is a fourth-year medical student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora who has a long-standing interest in working with persons with disabilities. She is pursuing a career in family medicine and plans to continue to work with this population.

Contributors

Kruti Acharya, MD, is a board-certified developmental and behavioral pediatrician and an assistant professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is also the director of the Illinois Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and other related Disabilities (LEND) Program. Dr. Acharya is particularly interested in supporting adolescents and young adults with developmental disabilities as they transition to adult systems of care. Her research focuses on the intersection of disability, ethics, and genetic testing and how best to support families who are managing these issues.

Brittany Badesch is a fourth-year medical student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora. She completed her undergraduate degree at Vanderbilt University with a focus on special education. She serves as the medical student council president and has served as co-president of the Disability Dialogue student organization. She plans to pursue a career in internal medicine and pediatrics with a focus on caring for children and adults with disabilities.

Kerry Boyd, MD, is an associate clinical professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University and works at McMaster Children’s Hospital and as the chief clinical officer of Bethesda Services in the province of Ontario, Canada. A psychiatrist with over 20 years of experience working with teams that serve people with intellectual and developmental disabilities across the lifespan, she is committed to improving the care of persons with developmental disabilities through education.

Peter Bulova, MD, is an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Pittsburgh in Pennsylvania, where he is director of the Center for Adults with Down syndrome. He is also the co-director of the Center for Women with Disabilities at Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Sonya Charles, PhD, is an associate professor in the Department of Philosophy and Comparative Religion at Cleveland State University in Ohio. Dr. Charles’s main areas of interest are bioethics and feminist philosophy, with a specialization in reproductive ethics issues. She has focused on theories of personal autonomy and, more recently, on virtue ethics in social and political philosophy.

Stephen Corey, MD, is an associate clinical professor in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Medicine at Magee-Womens Hospital of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pennsylvania, where he is also the co-director of the Center for Women with Disabilities.

Janet DesGeorges is a co-founder and, since September 2011, the executive director of Hands & Voices headquarters in Boulder, Colorado. Previously, she served as the outreach director of Hands & Voices headquarters and as the executive director of Colorado Families for Hands & Voices. She has a family member who is hard of hearing.

George Estreich is the author of a memoir about raising a daughter with Down syndrome, The Shape of the Eye (Penguin, 2013), which won the 2012 Oregon Book Award in Creative Nonfiction. His prose has been published in The Open Bar, Biopolitical Times, The Oregonian, Salon, and the New York Times.

Leslie Francis, JD, PhD, is Alfred C. Emery Professor of Law, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, and director of the Center for Law and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and is and is the President of the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association. She is currently editing the forthcoming book, Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics (Oxford University Press).

Yvonne Kellar-Guenther, PhD, is a clinical associate professor at the Colorado School of Public Health in Aurora. She specializes in program evaluation and has been conducting research on and evaluation of programs designed for children and adults with special health care needs for the past 16 years.

John Lantos, MD, is director of the Children’s Mercy Hospital Bioethics Center in Kansas City, Missouri. A general pediatrician and bioethicist, his research focuses on ethical issues associated with end-of-life decisions and innovative treatments in pediatrics.

Rick Rader, MD, is director of the Morton J. Kent Habilitation Center within the Orange Grove Center and an adjunct professor in human development at the University of Tennessee-Chattanooga in Chattanooga, Tennessee. He serves on the Board of the American Academy of Developmental Medicine and Dentistry and has focused his career on health care innovations in intellectual/neurodevelopmental disabilities, aging, and dementia.

Barbara Katz Rothman, PhD, is a professor of sociology, public health, disability studies and women’s studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in New York City, where she also runs the food studies concentration. She is a world-leading expert on issues of birth and midwifery, the new genetics and reproductive technologies, medical sociology, bioethics, disability, adoption race, and food.

Eva Schwartz, MD, is a second-year categorical pediatrics resident at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pennsylvania. She hopes to continue to work with children with intellectual disabilities and special health care needs. She has a family member with Down syndrome.

Anita Silvers, PhD, is a professor in and the chair of the Department of Philosophy at San Francisco State University and a community member of the San Francisco General Hospital Ethics Committee. Dr. Silvers has been awarded the American Philosophical Association Quinn Prize for service to philosophy and philosophers and the Phi Beta Kappa Society Lebowitz Prize for philosophical achievement and contribution and was appointed by the President of the United States to serve on the National Endowment for the Humanities’ National Council.

Lyubov Slashcheva is a fourth-year dental student at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry in Richmond. Upon graduating with her DDS in 2016, she will enroll in the University of Iowa College of Dentistry Dental Public Health master of science program and the Geriatric and Special Needs Dentistry certificate program. As a National Health Service Corps Dental Scholar, Lyubov aims to establish a career in improving the oral health and well-being of vulnerable populations, including older adults and persons with intellectual or developmental disabilities.

Stephen B. Sulkes, MD, is co-director of the Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities and of the University Center of Excellence in Developmental Disabilities (UCEDD) program within the Division of Neurodevelopmetnal and Behavioral Pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. A board certified developmental-behavioral pediatrician, Dr. Sulkes serves on the Board of the American Academy of Developmental Medicine and Dentistry.

Gareth M. Thomas, PhD, is a lecturer in Sociology at Cardiff University in the United Kingdom. His interests lie broadly in the fields of medical sociology, stigma, disability, health, reproduction, genetics and the family, risk, and place.

Kishore Vellody, MD, is an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine in Pennsylvania. He is also medical director of the Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania and on the executive committee for the Board of the National Down Syndrome Congress, whose Professional Advisory Committee he directs. In addition, he hosts the Down Syndrome Center of Western Pennsylvania Podcast and moderates the Dear Self About Down Syndrome blog. Finally, and most importantly, he has a family member with Down syndrome.

Richard Weinmeyer, JD, MA, MPhil, is a senior research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Mr. Weinmeyer received his master’s degree in bioethics and his law degree with a concentration in health law and bioethics from the University of Minnesota, where he served as editor in chief for volume 31 of Law and Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice. He obtained his first master’s degree in sociology from Cambridge University. Previously, Mr. Weinmeyer served as a project coordinator at the University of Minnesota Division of Epidemiology and Community Health. His research interests are in public health law, bioethics, and biomedical research regulation.

Jasmine Zahid is pursuing an MA in bioethics and medical humanities at Northwestern University in Chicago. She received her BA in philosophy from Carleton College and recently worked as an intern for the Ethics Group at the American Medical Association.