AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. July 2016, Volume 18, Number 7: 754-757.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Ethics of International Health Systems Development

Theme Issue Editor

Abraar Karan, MD, is an MPH candidate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston and a recent graduate of the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he served as the student body president and was part of the Global Health Pathway.

Contributors

Michele Barry, MD, is the senior associate dean for global health and director of the Center for Innovation in Global Health at Stanford University in Stanford, California. She is also a past president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

Danielle Chaet, MSB, is a research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Her work involves researching, developing, and disseminating ethics policy and analyzing current issues and opinions in bioethics. She obtained a master of science degree in bioethics, with a focus on clinical policy and clinical ethics consultation, from the joint program of Union Graduate College and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Anita Chary, MA, is an MD/PhD candidate in anthropology at Washington University in St. Louis. She is the research director of Maya Health Alliance, a health services nongovernmental organization in Guatemala, and the former editor-in-chief of the Global Health Hub.

Lucie Cluver, DPhil, is a professor of child and family social work at the University of Oxford in England and in the Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Lucie is co-primary investigator of the Mzantsi Wakho study of adolescents on antiretroviral therapy in the Eastern Cape.

Daniel DeUgarte, MD, is an associate clinical professor of surgery and co-director of the Global Health Education Programs at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Center for World Health. Since 2010, he has helped to train Mozambican surgeons through a twinning partnership between UCLA, the Eduardo Mondlane University, and Hospital Central de Maputo.

Ranu S. Dhillon, MD, is an instructor in medicine in the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston. For over a decade, he has worked on building primary and community health systems in several countries including Rwanda, Liberia, Nigeria, and India. As an advisor to the president of Guinea and the National Ebola Coordination Cell, he helped lead the country’s response to the Ebola epidemic.

Peter Drobac, MD, MPH, is a clinician who practices infectious disease medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and an educator who teaches global health and social medicine at Harvard University in Boston. A health systems researcher and the co-founder and executive director of the University of Global Health Equity (UGHE), Partners In Health’s new university in Rwanda, he has participated in the remarkable transformation of Rwanda’s health system over the past decade.

Rebecca Hodes, DPhil, is director of the AIDS and Society Research Unit in the Centre for Social Science Research at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Rebecca is co-principal investigator of the Mzantsi Wakho study about adolescents’ adherence to antiretroviral therapy and sexual health in the Eastern Cape.

Aaron S. Kesselheim, MD, JD, MPH, is an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a faculty member in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics in the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. At Brigham and Women’s, Dr. Kesselheim leads the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL), an interdisciplinary research core focusing on intersections among prescription drugs and medical devices, patient health outcomes, and regulatory practices and the law. Dr. Kesselheim is a Greenwall Faculty Scholar in Bioethics and is also supported by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation and the Harvard Program in Therapeutic Science.

Jing Luo, MD, is an instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. He trained in primary care internal medicine at Yale New Haven Hospital. His research interests include access to medicines, pharmaceutical drug pricing, and pharmaceutical regulation.

Harriet Mayanja-Kizza, MBChB, MMed, MSc, is an internist and a researcher at Makerere University College of Health Sciences, where she was the chair of internal medicine for eight years, then dean of the school of medicine for five years. She is also the Makerere co-director of the Makerere University-Yale University (MUYU) Collaboration, in which capacity she supervises the exchange of residents and students. In addition, she has mentored students in clinical research at the master’s and doctoral levels and has been conducting research on tuberculosis and HIV with an emphasis on immuno-pathogenesis, tuberculosis epidemiology, and clinical trials.

Michelle Morse, MD, MPH, is the deputy chief medical officer at Partners In Health, an assistant program director for the internal medicine residency program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston. A visiting professor at the University of Global Health Equity, Dr. Morse has spent much of her career working in medical education program strengthening in global health settings, including leading a social medicine course in Haiti for local and international medical and nursing students.

Pranay Nadella studies statistics and global health at Harvard College in Boston. Because his primary passion is maternal and child health, he conducts research on child nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and serves on the National Youth Council of the March of Dimes, a US-based nonprofit focused on preventing premature births, birth defects, and infant mortality.

Nicoli Nattrass, DPhil, MSc, MA, is a professor in the Centre for Social Science Research and the School of Economics at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. She has written extensively on the political economy of South Africa and access to antiretroviral therapy.

Tracy L. Rabin, MD, SM, is an assistant professor of medicine in the Section of General Internal Medicine and the assistant director of the Office of Global Health in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. She is also the associate program director for Global and Community Health in the Yale Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program. Since 2011, she has served as the Yale co-director of the Makerere University-Yale University (MUYU) Collaboration. Having previously worked in international health research ethics, her current focus is on global health workforce education and ethical challenges related to short-term clinical work in resource-limited settings.

Asghar Rastegar, MD, is a professor of medicine and the director of the Office of Global Health in the Department of Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, where he previously served as the vice chair for academic affairs. For the past four decades he has worked in leadership roles, both in the US and abroad, with a focus on developing training programs for students, residents, and fellows and on bilateral capacity building. A nephrologist, he has also served as the co-chair of the International Society of Nephrology Education Committee.

Samuel G. Ruchman is a programs associate in the Office of the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy for Health in Agenda 2030 and for Malaria in New York City. He holds an AB in African studies from Harvard University and is an incoming medical student at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Carolyn Sargent, PhD, is a professor of anthropology and an affiliate professor of women, gender, and sexuality studies at Washington University in St. Louis. She is former president of the Society for Medical Anthropology, currently serves on the Barnes Jewish Hospital Ethics Committee, and has served on the ethics committees of Baylor University Medical Center and Parkland Memorial Hospital.

Prabhjot Singh, MD, PhD, is chair of the Department of Health System Design and Global Health at Mount Sinai Health System and director of the Arnhold Institute for Global Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. He is a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Young Leader, a Truman National Security Fellow, and term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Anna Stapleton is the program manager for policy at the Arnhold Institute for Global Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City. A former White House intern, she holds an AB in sociology from the University of Chicago.

Helen Tilley, PhD, is an associate professor of history at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, where she directs the Science in Human Culture Program and is an affiliate of the Program of African Studies.

Richard Weinmeyer, JD, MA, MPhil, is a senior research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Mr. Weinmeyer received a master’s degree in bioethics and a law degree with a concentration in health law and bioethics from the University of Minnesota, where he served as editor in chief for volume 31 of Law and Inequality: A Journal of Theory and Practice. He obtained his first master’s degree in sociology from Cambridge University. Previously, Mr. Weinmeyer served as a project coordinator at the University of Minnesota Division of Epidemiology and Community Health. His research interests are in public health law, bioethics, and biomedical research regulation.