AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. September 2016, Volume 18, Number 9: 965-968.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Ethics and Interprofessionalism in Medical Education

Theme Issue Editor

Colleen Farrell is a fifth-year medical student at Harvard Medical School in Boston. She received her BA in women’s and gender studies from Williams College in 2010 and, prior to medical school, was a research assistant at the Hastings Center. She plans to pursue residency training in family medicine. Her interests include primary care, creative writing, and medical education.

Contributors

Nancy Berlinger, PhD, is a research scholar at the Hastings Center in Garrison, New York. She is the first author of the second edition of the Hastings Center Guidelines for Decisions on Life-Sustaining Treatment and Care Near the End of Life (Oxford University Press, 2013) and the author of Are Workarounds Ethical?: Managing Moral Problems in Health Care Systems (Oxford University Press, 2016) and After Harm: Medical Error and the Ethics of Forgiveness (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2005). She studies ethical challenges in health care work, including chronic illness, aging, and the end of life; the clinical and organizational management of problems of safety and harm; and health care access for undocumented immigrants.

Johan Bester, MBChB, MPhil, is a member of the professional staff of the Department of Bioethics at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, where he conducts clinical ethics consultations, teaches bioethics, and engages in bioethics scholarship. Johan is also a PhD candidate in applied ethics at Stellenbosch University, South Africa.

Maureen Brodie, MA, is the mediation officer for the University of California, San Francisco, overseeing the mediation services unit, and is also a certified organizational ombuds practitioner for the school. From 1996-2010, she served as the senior mediator at the University of California, Davis, where she provided two-party mediation and group facilitation services to faculty, staff, professional and graduate students, and trainees.

Paul Burcher, MD, PhD, is an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology and bioethics at Albany Medical College in Albany, New York, where he is also the program director for residency education in obstetrics and gynecology and the associate director of bioethics. His areas of research include clinical ethics, reproductive ethics, and patient-physician relationships.

Angel Chen, RN, MSN, CPNP, is an associate clinical professor and the vice chair of family health care nursing in the School of Nursing at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She also is the co-chair of the Curriculum Development Working Group for the UCSF Program for Interprofessional Practice and Education, providing faculty development for interprofessional education and clinical precepting, and is a certified pediatric nurse practitioner in pediatric urology at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital.

Cristie M. Cole, JD, joined the professional staff in the Department of Bioethics at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, as a regional bioethicist in the spring of 2014. She is responsible for directing ethics programming and managing the ethics consultation services at Cleveland Clinic’s Euclid, Hillcrest, Marymount, and South Pointe hospitals. Ms. Cole is also the acting ethics liaison for Cleveland Clinic’s Genomic Medicine Institute.

Elizabeth Dietz is a research assistant and project manager at the Hastings Center in Garrison, New York.

Helen Jack is a third-year medical student at Harvard Medical School in Boston, where she has helped coordinate the Student Coalition on Addiction, an advocacy group that aims to improve access to substance use treatment for the state’s most vulnerable residents. Helen received a BA from Yale University in 2012 and pursued a second BA in philosophy, politics, and economics at the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar before beginning medical school.

Marshall B. Kapp, MPH, JD, is director of the Center for Innovative Collaboration in Medicine and Law and a professor in the College of Medicine and College of Law at Florida State University in Tallahassee. He is professor emeritus of the Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine and also served as the Garwin Distinguished Professor of Law and Medicine at Southern Illinois University.

Eric Kodish, MD, is the inaugural director of Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Ethics, Humanities and Spiritual Care in Cleveland, Ohio, where he also serves as the F. J. O’Neill Professor and chairman of the Department of Bioethics. He is also the executive director of the Cleveland Fellowship in Advanced Bioethics and a professor of pediatrics at the Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University.

Melissa J. Kurtz, MSN, MA, RN, is a doctoral candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore and a registered nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. From 2011-2013, she served as a bioethics fellow at Montefiore Medical Center. Her doctoral research focuses on the decision-making processes of parents with critically ill children and the provision of ethical care in intensive care settings.

Anna T. Mayo, MS, is a PhD student in organizational behavior and theory at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Her research addresses team performance, expertise use, and collective intelligence.

Kirsten Meisinger, MD, is a clinical instructor at Harvard Medical School in Boston and a family medicine physician at the Cambridge Health Alliance in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where she is also incoming medical staff president and medical director of the Union Square site, a patient-centered medical home. She graduated from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and completed a residency in family medicine at Greater Lawrence Family Health.

Aimee Milliken, MSN, RN, is a doctoral student in the Connell School of Nursing at Boston College and an ICU nurse at an academic medical center in Boston. Her doctoral research will focus on critical care nurses’ ethical awareness.

Meghan Rudder, MD, is a resident in the internal medicine primary care program at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and a graduate of Harvard Medical School. She is interested in the use of interdisciplinary teams to address mental health and substance use disorders in primary care settings.

Lisa Simon, DMD, is a fellow in oral health and medicine integration at Harvard School of Dental Medicine in Boston and a medical student at Harvard Medical School. Her work focuses on health disparities and the integration of oral health and primary care.

Laura E. Starbird, MS, RN, is a doctoral candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing in Baltimore. From 2011-2013, she served as a nurse case manager to HIV-infected adults at the San Francisco Department of Public Health. Her doctoral research focuses on improving access to and utilization of health care among persons co-infected with HIV and hepatitis C.

Lulu Tsao, MD, is an internal medicine resident at the University of California, San Francisco, and a graduate of Harvard Medical School. She is interested in the use of palliative care, especially among vulnerable populations, and the balanced use of opioids in pain and addiction.

Diana Wohler, MD, is a family medicine resident physician at Memorial Hospital of Rhode Island, an affiliate of the Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. She is a graduate of Harvard Medical School.

Anita Williams Woolley, PhD, is an associate professor of organizational behavior and theory at the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. Her work has appeared in Science, Social Neuroscience, Journal of Organizational Behavior, Organization Science, Academy of Management Review, Small Group Research, and multiple edited volumes. Her research addresses team performance, collective intelligence, and managing multiple team memberships.

Shara Yurkiewicz, MD, is a second-year resident in physical medicine and rehabilitation at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California. She is a former guest editor for the AMA Journal of Ethics and a former editorial intern for the Hastings Center. She has written for a variety of publications, including the Los Angeles Times, MedPage Today, Discover, Scientific American, and the PLoS blog network.