AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. May 2017, Volume 19, Number 5: 510-513.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Ethics in Mental Health and Oncology

Theme Issue Editor

Weisheng Renee Mao is a third-year medical student at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, DC. She is interested in psychiatry, medical ethics, and medical humanities.

Contributors

Arwa K. Aburizik, MD, MS, is a clinical assistant professor of hematology, oncology and blood and marrow transplantation, and psychiatry at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City. She specializes in caring for medically ill patients with psychiatric comorbidity and has a special focus on psycho-oncology.

Walter Baile, MD, is a distinguished teaching professor in the departments of psychiatry and behavioral science at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. He is also director of the Interpersonal Communication and Relationship Enhancement (I*Care) program at MD Anderson Cancer Center, where he develops and oversees teaching in the area of clinician-patient communication.

Joshua M. Baruth, MD, PhD, is a resident in the Department of Psychiatry & Psychology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He obtained his MD and PhD from the University of Louisville and completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in psychiatry at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester. He has an ongoing interest in medical education and ethics.

Amy E. Caruso Brown, MD, MSc, MSCS, is an assistant professor in the Center for Bioethics and Humanities and the Department of Pediatrics at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York, where she also co-directs Foundations of Reasoning in Medicine, a required course for preclinical medical students. She earned a medical degree from Emory University, a master’s degree in medical anthropology from the University of Oxford, and a master’s degree in clinical science from the University of Colorado. She completed residency and fellowship training in pediatrics and pediatric oncology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the Children’s Hospital Colorado.

Maria Teresa Delgado-Marroquín, MD, PhD, is a general practitioner at Delicias Norte Health Center in Zaragoza, Spain, and an assistant professor of ethics at the University of Zaragoza Medical School. She has a PhD in medical ethics.

Allen R. Dyer, MD, PhD, is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and the vice-chair for education at the George Washington University (GW) in Washington, DC, where he is also director of the GW Psycho-oncology Clinic.

Rebecca Garden, PhD, is an associate professor in the Center for Bioethics and Humanities at Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, New York. She earned her doctorate in English literature at Columbia University and has published in a range of journals including New Literary History, the Journal of General Internal Medicine, and the Journal of Clinical Ethics. She is executive director of the inter-institutional Consortium for Culture and Medicine and president of the Medical Humanities and Health Studies Forum executive committee for the Modern Language Association.

Eva Gracia-Peligero, MD, is a psychiatrist at University Clinical Hospital Lozano Blesa in Zaragoza, Spain, and chair of the medical ethics committee in sector III Zaragoza.

Heidi A. Hamann, PhD, is an associate professor in the Departments of Psychology and Family and Community Medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Her primary research focuses on psychosocial and behavioral concerns, including stigma of lung cancer patients and survivors.

Jerry Joseph Ignatius, DO, is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. He has a special interest in demoralization and spirituality in cancer patients.

Arif H. Kamal, MD, MBA, MHS, is a medical oncologist and palliative medicine physician at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, where he is also the physician quality and outcomes officer for the Duke Cancer Institute.

Mónica Lalanda, MD, MSc, is an emergency medicine physician and holds master of science degrees in medical ethics and bioethics. She is also a comic artist.

Maria I. Lapid, MD, is a geriatric psychiatrist and palliative care specialist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. After college and medical school in her native Philippines, Dr. Lapid completed her residency and fellowship training in the United States, gaining clinical expertise through formal training programs in psychiatry, geriatric psychiatry, and hospice and palliative medicine, and through practice in inpatient and outpatient geriatric psychiatry settings and in the inpatient palliative care consultation service and hospice program. At the Mayo Clinic, she has led research projects on investigations of various clinical issues relevant to electroconvulsive therapy, palliative care, and quality of life in elderly patients.

Thomas W. LeBlanc, MD, MA, MHS, is a medical oncologist and palliative medicine physician at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, where he is also a patient experience researcher at the Duke Cancer Institute.

Laurel J. Lyckholm, MD, is a clinical professor of hematology, oncology and blood and marrow transplantation at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City, where she is also a primary faculty member in the Program in Bioethics and Humanities and a consultant on the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Ethics Consult Service. Dr. Lyckholm’s research and clinical interests are directed toward improving cancer and palliative care for the most vulnerable of our citizens.

Monica R. Martinez will complete her JD at the George Mason University School of Law in Arlington, Virginia, in 2017. Her research interests include administrative law, disability law, and food and drug law.

Fremonta Meyer, MD, is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School in Boston, where she is also an attending psychiatrist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

Fatima Noorani, MD, is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the George Washington University in Washington, DC, and she is also the medical director of the McClendon Center.

Jamie S. Ostroff, PhD, is the chief of the behavioral sciences service in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and a professor of psychology in the Department of Healthcare Policy and Research at Weill Cornell Medical College, both in New York City. Her cancer prevention and control research focuses on tobacco cessation and stigma experienced by patients with lung cancer.

Amirala Pasha, DO, MS, is an assistant professor of medicine at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, DC. He is also completing his JD at the George Washington University Law School. He has a strong interest in health law and policy as well as bioethics.

Kristen E. Riley, PhD, is a postdoctoral research fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, where she studies health behavior decision making and tobacco cessation for cancer prevention.

Philip M. Rosoff, MD, MA, is a professor of pediatrics (oncology) and medicine at Duke University Medical Center and Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, where he is also a member scholar in the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities & History of Medicine and chair of Duke Hospital’s ethics committee. His latest book is Drawing the Line: Healthcare Rationing and the Cutoff Problem (Oxford University Press, 2017). His scholarly interest is in the area of the equitable distribution of scarce resources (rationing).

Michael R. Ulrich, JD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Center for Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights and the Department of Health, Law, and Policy Management at Boston University School of Public Health. He studies public health, ethics, and law.

David P. Yuppa, MD, is an attending psychiatrist at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital and an instructor in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School in Boston. He is a former fellow of the American Psychoanalytic Association and a candidate in adult psychoanalysis at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute.