AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. July 2017, Volume 19, Number 7: 732-735.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Quality of Life in Dementia

Theme Issue Editor

James M. Wilkins, MD, DPhil, is a geriatric psychiatry fellow at Partners Healthcare in Boston. He graduated from Bowdoin College, completed a DPhil in human genetics at the University of Oxford as a Marshall Scholar, and received an MD from Harvard Medical School. He completed psychiatry residency in the Massachusetts General Hospital-McLean Hospital Adult Psychiatry Residency Program, where he served as chief resident in geriatric psychiatry, in addition to holding a fellowship in bioethics through the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School. His academic interests lie at the interface of geriatric psychiatry and bioethics.

Contributors

Jesse F. Ballenger, PhD, MA, is an associate teaching professor in the Health Administration Department at Drexel University in Philadelphia, where he teaches bioethics and health care history. He is author of Self, Senility and Alzheimer’s Disease in Modern America: A History (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2006), and a co-editor of Concepts of Alzheimer Disease: Biological, Clinical and Cultural Perspectives (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000) and Treating Dementia: Do We Have a Pill for It? (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009).

James L. Bernat, MD, is the Louis and Ruth Frank Professor of Neuroscience and a professor of medicine and neurology at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and in the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Beth Bienvenu, PhD, is the accessibility director at the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) in Washington, DC, where she manages the NEA’s technical assistance and advocacy work on making the arts accessible to underserved populations. She provides guidance and support to professionals working in arts access, creative aging, arts and health, universal design, and arts in corrections.

Jennifer Carson, PhD, is a research assistant professor in the School of Community Health Sciences and director of the Gerontology Academic Program at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Carson is a critical gerontologist who works to envision and develop opportunities for personal, cultural, and systemic growth to combat ageism and improve the well-being of elders, with a particular interest in persons living with dementia.

Danielle Hahn Chaet, MSB, is a research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Her work involves researching, developing, and disseminating ethics policy and analyzing current issues and opinions in bioethics. She obtained her master of science degree in bioethics, with a focus on clinical policy and clinical ethics consultation, from the joint program of Union Graduate College and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Helen Stanton Chapple, PhD, RN, MA, MSN, CT, is an associate professor at the Center for Health Policy and Ethics at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. She teaches ethics both online and in the classroom to nursing and graduate students in the health care ethics master’s degree program. Her book, No Place for Dying: Hospitals and the Ideology of Rescue (Left Coast Press, 2010) features her research on how dying happens in the hospital.

Laura B. Dunn, MD, is a professor of psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University in Palo Alto, California, where she is also the director of the Stanford Geriatric Psychiatry Fellowship Training Program. She is an expert in the empirical study of ethical issues in clinical research.

Zebbedia Gibb, PhD, is a research associate in the Sanford Center for Aging at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Gibb recently received his PhD in interdisciplinary social psychology. His main research interest is the influence of culture on individual behavior.

Gay Hanna, PhD, MFA, is the president of Hanna Merrill, Inc., a consulting service on research, policy, and practice for arts in medicine in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. Hanna has held faculty positions at Florida State University, University of South Florida, and George Washington University, where she served as co-principal investigator of the Washington D.C. Area Geriatric Education Center Consortium. Her current work includes researching and writing on topics at the intersection of arts, health, and well-being.

Kimberly Hornbeck, MD, is a pediatric primary care sports medicine physician at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. She is also an assistant professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Medical College of Wisconsin. Her interests include musculoskeletal injuries and concussion in the young athlete.

Louise P. King, MD, JD, is an assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology, and reproductive biology at Harvard Medical School in Boston. She is also a surgeon within the Division of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Dr. King completed her JD at Tulane Law School before attending medical school at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. She completed her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Parkland Hospital in Dallas, Texas, and her fellowship in minimally invasive surgery at Stanford University. Her areas of interest in medical ethics include questions of autonomy in informed consent and assisted reproduction.

Marianna V. Mapes is an ethics intern at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. She earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy and classical studies from Smith College, where she wrote an honors thesis on Plato’s contributions to our current understanding of social determinants of health. Her research and professional interests include patient-physician communication, health disparities, and systems-level approaches to ethics in health care.

Eran Metzger, MD, is an assistant professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School in Boston. He is also director of psychiatry at Hebrew SeniorLife and a member of the Department of Psychiatry at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. His research and teaching interests include medical ethics in long-term care, collaborative care treatment of depression in primary care geriatrics, and the biological basis of delirium.

Matthew Myrvik, PhD, is an assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery and of psychiatry and behavioral medicine at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. He is also the lead psychologist of the primary care sports medicine and sports concussion programs at the Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. His research focuses on the influence of psychological factors on medical symptoms in various medical illness groups.

Louise O’Boyle, MA, is a lecturer in art and design in the Belfast School of Art at Ulster University in the United Kingdom. She earned an arts degree at Manchester Metropolitan University, a master’s degree in applied arts at Ulster University, and is currently undertaking doctoral studies in education at Queens University. In tandem with her academic work, she is a practicing artist. Her artwork and research focus on the relationship between the arts, health, and well-being.

Barbara M. O’Brien, MD, is an associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology in the Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the associate director for the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clerkship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She is also the director of the Maternal Fetal Medicine Fellowship at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC). Pursuant to her interest in medical education, she is working to create a board-approved combined Maternal Fetal Medicine/Genetics fellowship within the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at BIDMC.

Barton W. Palmer, PhD, is a professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, and a clinical psychologist at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System. He has been actively engaged in empirical research on ethical dilemmas in research for over 15 years.

Peter Reed, PhD, MPH, is the director of the Sanford Center for Aging and a professor in the School of Community Health Sciences at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Reed’s career as a public health gerontologist has spanned research, policy, and practice in a range of non-profit and academic settings. His primary focus is on strategies for enhancing quality of care and quality of life to promote well-being among elders living with dementia.

Nathaniel M. Robbins, MD, is an assistant professor of neurology at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and in the Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Kevin Walter, MD, is an associate professor in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, where he is the medical leader of its sports concussion clinic. He is also the program director of pediatric and adolescent sports medicine at Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin. He is interested in pediatric musculoskeletal injuries and concussion in the young athlete.