AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. September 2017, Volume 19, Number 9: 949-953.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Incarceration and Correctional Health Care

Theme Issue Editor

Lisa Simon, DMD, is a second-year medical student at Harvard Medical School in Boston and a fellow in oral health and medicine integration at the Harvard School of Dental Medicine. She works as a dentist at Boston’s Suffolk County Jail and is the faculty dentist for the jail’s student clinic.

Contributors

Cyrus Ahalt, MPP, is a researcher and policy analyst in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where he co-directs the program on criminal justice and health and the US-European Criminal Justice Innovation Program. Mr. Ahalt conducts policy-oriented research on the individual and public health consequences of the US criminal justice system.

David Beckmann, MD, MPH, is a fellow in child and adolescent psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital and McLean Hospital and a clinical fellow at Harvard Medical School in Boston. He is interested in correctional psychiatry and helped to create a new residency rotation at a Boston jail, where he works as the mental health faculty advisor and preceptor for a student-faculty collaborative clinic.

Marielle Bolano is a fourth-year medical student at the University of California, Davis School of Medicine. She has worked at the University of California, San Francisco Division of Geriatrics as a research assistant to study health needs of older adults in the criminal justice system and as a National Institute on Aging Medical Student Training in Aging Research Fellow. She has a strong interest in geriatrics and is particularly interested in improving access to care for vulnerable older adults, including those in the criminal justice system.

Amy B. Cadwallader, PhD, is a senior policy analyst in the Science, Medicine, and Public Health Unit at the American Medical Association in Chicago who has nearly ten years of experience working in the drug testing field. She received her doctoral degree in pharmacology and analytical toxicology and has a master’s degree in biology/forensic science.

Joseph P. Calderon, CHW, is a community health worker with the Transitions Clinic Network in San Francisco, where he also teaches and trains community health workers. He has a passion for working with diverse and disenfranchised populations, leveraging his personal experience with incarceration to advocate the ideals of social justice and community investment.

Anna M. Darby, MD, MPH, is a second-year emergency medicine resident at Los Angeles County + USC Medical Center, where she works in the dedicated Jail Emergency Department that serves Los Angeles County. She has worked as a litigation assistant at the Prison Law Office advocating for prisoners’ health care needs and as a National Institute on Aging Medical Student Training in Aging Research Fellow at the University of California, San Francisco, doing research on older adults in jail.

Elizabeth Dreesen, MD, is a trauma surgeon and the chief of the General and Acute Care Surgery Division of the Department of Surgery at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She completed her surgical residency at the New England Deaconess Hospital and a fellowship in trauma and critical care at the University of Maryland.

Monica L. Gerrek, PhD, is an assistant professor in the Department of Bioethics at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, where she is co-director of the Center for Biomedical Ethics. She is also the co-director of the MetroHealth Institute of Burn Ethics. Her interests include food ethics, the ethics of addiction, and international perspectives on health care.

Jonathan Giftos, MD, is the director of clinical education for the NYC Health + Hospitals Division of Correctional Health Services in New York City, where he teaches and provides clinical care to incarcerated patients in the New York City jail system. He is also a clinical instructor of medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and a voluntary attending physician in the Bronx Transitions Clinic at Montefiore’s Comprehensive Health Care Center.

Leah Jeunnette, PhD, is a senior research associate in the Department of Bioethics at Case Western Reserve University and a clinical ethicist at the MetroHealth System in Cleveland, Ohio. She has interests in clinical ethics consultation, ethics education, and the ethics of fertility preservation.

Ross MacDonald, MD, is the chief medical officer for the NYC Health + Hospitals Division of Correctional Health Services in New York City. He is also an assistant professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine and the author of numerous articles on correctional health and human rights.

Despina Mavrakis, MBA, is the ambulatory director of the MetroHealth Correctional Health Program at the Cuyahoga County Corrections Center in Cleveland, Ohio. She is certified in executive coaching, serves on MetroHealth’s ethics committee, and has an interest in ethics education.

Lia Metzger is an assistant clinical research coordinator for the Division of Geriatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, where she conducts research to identify and assess the health needs of older adults in the criminal justice system. She has a strong interest in geriatrics and palliative medicine and is especially interested in improving health outcomes for vulnerable older adults.

Andreas Mitchell is a fourth-year medical student at Harvard Medical School and is also pursuing a master’s degree in public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in Boston. He has served as co-chair of the student leadership committee of the Harvard Medical School Center for Primary Care and is a student member of the board of the Academic Consortium on Criminal Justice Health, an organization with which he has partnered to create a digital curriculum on criminal justice and health.

Annalise Norling is a fourth-year undergraduate at Loyola University Chicago, where she studies philosophy and biology with a concentration in bioethics. During the summer of 2017, she was an intern for the American Medical Association’s Ethics Group.

Tom Peteet, MD, is an internal medicine physician and rural health fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. His interests include bioethics, addiction medicine, public health, and correctional medicine.

Lisa Puglisi, MD, is an assistant professor of general internal medicine at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut. She is also co-director of Transitions Clinic Network-New Haven, a clinical program focused on providing postincarceration primary care in partnership with community health workers.

Satyajeet Roy, MD, is an associate professor of medicine at the Cooper Medical School of Rowan University in Camden, New Jersey. He is also an internal medicine-primary care physician at Cooper University Health Care and the director of resident research for the Cooper University Hospital Internal Medicine Residency Program. He enjoys taking care of his patients, teaching medical students and residents, conducting research, performing music, and sketching and painting various aspects of human emotions he has observed in his interactions with others.

Sara Scarlet, MD, is a fifth-year general surgery resident and member of the hospital ethics committee at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. She is currently pursuing advanced training in surgical ethics at the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago. Her interests include moral distress among health care professionals, the ethics of correctional health care, and ethics education for surgeon trainees.

Oliver Schirokauer, PhD, MD, is a senior research associate in the Department of Bioethics at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) in Cleveland, Ohio, where his responsibilities include oversight of the ethics curriculum for CWRU’s medical students. He is also a clinical ethicist at the MetroHealth System. He recently launched a clinical program to support patients adjusting to major illness by helping them with communication, information processing, and decision making.

Rebecca Sudore, MD, is a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, where she serves as a geriatrician, palliative medicine physician, and clinician investigator and directs the Innovation Center for Action-oriented REsearch in Aging & Palliative Care. Dr. Sudore conducts research to improve advance care planning and medical decision making for diverse, vulnerable older adults.

Kimberly Sue, MD, PhD, is a resident physician in internal medicine primary care at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Her clinical interests include addiction in primary care as well as optimizing care for people with histories of incarceration. Her ethnographic research examines the intersection of US prison systems, addiction policy, mental health, and drug treatment in Massachusetts at the state women’s prison, a Boston jail, and a community-based buprenorphine and naloxone treatment program.

Thomas A. Tallman, DO, MMM, is medical director of the MetroHealth Correctional Health Program at the Cuyahoga County Corrections Center and a faculty member at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio. A Navy veteran, he is board certified in emergency medicine and is a certified correctional health professional through the National Commission on Correctional Health Care. His interests include emergency preparedness, disaster medicine, education, and hands-on teaching.

Matt Tobey, MD, MPH, is an internal medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He supervises an interdisciplinary student clinic in a jail, coordinates an academic-rural partnership, and practices primary care. His interests include rural and correctional health.

Sarah E. Wakeman, MD, is the medical director for the Massachusetts General Hospital Substance Use Disorder Initiative in Boston, where she is also program director of the Addiction Medicine Fellowship, medical director of the Addiction Consult Team, and co-chair of the Opioid Task Force. She is also an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a clinical lead of the Partners Healthcare Substance Use Disorder Initiative. Her research interests include evaluating models for integrated substance use disorder treatment in general medical settings, recovery coaching, physician attitudes and preparedness related to substance use disorder, and screening for substance use in primary care

Emily A. Wang, MD, MAS, is an associate professor at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and co-founder of the Transitions Clinic Network. She has developed expertise in training formerly incarcerated people to become community health workers and researchers through community-based participatory research methods. Dr. Wang’s research focuses on promoting health equity for vulnerable populations, especially people with a history of incarceration.

Brie Williams, MD, MS, is a professor of medicine in the Division of Geriatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, where she directs the Criminal Justice & Health Program and the Criminal Justice Aging Project. In her work on bringing the science of geriatrics and palliative care to criminal justice reform, she collaborates with colleagues from diverse disciplines, including criminal justice, public safety, and the law, to conduct impact-oriented research and education.