AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. January 2018, Volume 20, Number 1: 107-111.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Clinicians’ Responsiveness to Violence

Theme Issue Editor

Lilliana Freire-Vargas is a second-year medical student at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine in Maywood, Illinois.

Contributors

Karan S. Ahluwalia is a third-year medical student at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. His interests include health policy, disparities, and prevention.

Amy Barnhorst, MD, is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Davis, where she is also an emergency and inpatient psychiatrist who conducts violence and suicide risk assessments as part of her clinical care. She conducts research on the interface between firearm violence, suicide, and mental illness.

Marian E. Betz, MD, MPH, is an associate professor of emergency medicine at the University of Colorado in Denver, where she is also an emergency medicine physician. She conducts research in injury and suicide prevention, and is a leading expert on how physicians should address lethal means access with patients at risk for suicide.

Michelle Bowdler, MSPH, is the executive director of Health and Wellness Services at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. She received her master of science in public health degree from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in 1993. She has been involved in policy, treatment, and response to sexual assault on college campuses for over 15 years, and is a national advocate on rape and social justice concerns, specifically in law enforcement response and the untested rape kit backlog nationwide.

Danielle Hahn Chaet, MSB, is a research associate for the American Medical Association Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs in Chicago. Her work involves researching, developing, and disseminating ethics policy and analyzing current issues and opinions in bioethics. She obtained her master of science degree in bioethics, with a focus on clinical policy and clinical ethics consultation, from the joint program of Union Graduate College and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Nicole D. Damari, MS, is a third-year medical student at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. She holds an MS in pathobiology from Brown University. She is interested in population health, health policy, and the health of underserved and marginalized communities.

Gretchen A. Ferber, MFA, is third-year medical student at Northeastern Ohio Medical University in Rootstown, Ohio. Gretchen holds a BA from Duke University in religion, a BS from Cleveland State University in health sciences, and an MFA from the University of Cincinnati in studio arts. Her background in documentary photography and doctor-patient communication has informed her research interests in narrative medicine and bioethics.

Adam O. Goldstein, MD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill, where he also serves as the director of departmental advancement. Dr. Goldstein’s research interests include policies and programs to prevent tobacco use, obesity, and firearm violence.

Kelsey Hills-Evans, MD, is a resident physician in internal medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Her interests focus on the intersection of social justice and critical care medicine, including violence prevention, substance use disorders in intensive care settings, and preventable harms in the critically ill. She is also interested in finding ways to engage physicians in community activism and leads multiple initiatives in her residency for social change.

Nora Jones, PhD, is an anthropologist and bioethicist at Temple University in Philadelphia, where she serves as the associate director of the Center for Bioethics, Urban Health, and Policy and director of the master’s program in urban bioethics. Her interests focus on culture and health, urban bioethics, and health equity.

Hannah Kent is a fourth-year undergraduate in cognitive science at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, where she is also pursuing a master’s degree in bioethics. She is an alumna of the Sherwin B. Nuland Summer Institute in Bioethics at Yale University. She is passionate about the cognitive influences on ethical decision making and plans to pursue a career in bioethics and public health.

Bandy X. Lee, MD, MDiv, is an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. Her academic focus has been on global violence prevention and the promotion of peace through health.

Dino Maglić, MD, is a first-year integrated plastic surgery resident at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. In addition to academics, he has an interest in photorealistic illustration.

Melinda Manning, JD, MSW, is the director of the Beacon Program, which provides care to pediatric and adult patients affected by abuse and violence, at the University of North Carolina Hospitals in Chapel Hill. A former college administrator, her research interests include the effects of intimate partner violence on breastfeeding and the ethics of working with survivors of intimate partner violence.

Alexander D. McCourt, JD, MPH, is a PhD candidate in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore. He earned a JD from the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law and an MPH from the University of Arizona Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health. His research interests include public health law, firearm policy, and suicide.

Julian Mitton, MD, MPH, is a primary care physician at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, where he is also a fellow in the Rural Health Leadership program. He is also an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School and a physician with the Rosebud Indian Health Service Unit in South Dakota. He is involved in social justice and physician advocacy curricular programming and has a research interest in substance use disorders.

Jenny Nguyen is a second-year medical student at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia, where she is enrolled in a dual-degree MD/MA program in urban bioethics. She received a BS in molecular biophysics and biochemistry from Yale University in 2016. Her interests focus on minority health, health equity, culturally compelling care, urban bioethics, and immunobiology.

Joy O. Ogunmuyiwa is a third-year medical student at Northeastern Ohio Medical University in Rootstown, Ohio. Joy holds a BA in biology and certificates in film and global health studies from Duke University and a BS in health sciences from Cleveland State University.

Rejoice Opara, MD, is a psychiatrist at Valley Medical Center in Renton, Washington. At the time this article was written, she was a fourth-year psychiatry resident at the University of Washington.

Jennifer L. Piel, JD, MD, is an assistant professor and an associate residency director in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle. She is also a staff psychiatrist at the VA Puget Sound Health Care System. An adult and forensic psychiatrist, Dr. Piel has served as an expert consultant on a variety of cases involving medical-legal issues, and her scholarly work focuses on topics in law and medicine.

Charles Ransford, MPP, is the senior director of science and policy at Cure Violence, where he is responsible for all policy, research, and communications.

Anita Ravi, MD, MPH, MSHP, is the founder and medical director of the Institute for Family Health’s PurpLE (Purpose: Listen and Engage) Clinic, a primary care clinic for people who have experienced sexual violence and human rights-related abuses. She is a family medicine physician, a public health researcher, and an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Kathleen Reeves, MD, is the director of the Center for Bioethics, Urban Health, and Policy at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia, where she is also the senior associate dean in the Office of Health Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion and a member of the pediatric faculty. Dr. Reeves is interested in the social, economic, cultural, and environmental determinants of health.

Chana A. Sacks, MD, is a general internist at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in Boston. She is also a research fellow in the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and an instructor in medicine at Harvard Medical School. Since the death of a relative in the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, she has worked to keep a spotlight on the importance of a public health approach to the issue of gun violence. She is the co-creator of the MGH Gun Violence Prevention Coalition and has lectured regularly and published articles on the topic of physicians’ role in gun violence prevention.

Gary Slutkin, MD, is a physician, epidemiologist, infectious disease control specialist, and the founder and executive director of Cure Violence. He is also a professor of epidemiology and international health at University of Illinois at Chicago. He formerly served as medical director for the tuberculosis program for the San Francisco Health Department (1981-1985), where he learned infectious disease control methods and worked for the World Health Organization (1987 to 1994) reversing epidemics, including being principally responsible for supporting Uganda’s AIDS program.

Nicolle K. Strand, JD, MBioethics, is an assistant professor and assistant director for research at the Center for Bioethics, Urban Health, and Policy at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia. She formerly served on the staff of the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues under President Obama, contributing to work on neuroscience and ethics, genetics and privacy, and human subject research protections.

Jessica C. Tomazic is a third-year medical student at Northeast Ohio Medical University in Rootstown, Ohio. Jessica holds a BS in art, philosophy, and literature from the United States Military Academy at West Point and a BS in health sciences from Cleveland State University. Her background in athletics and her service in the United States Army have influenced her medical interests.

Jon S. Vernick, JD, MPH, is a professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore and co-director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research. He earned a JD from George Washington University and an MPH from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. His research and practice interests focus on using law and policy as tools to prevent injury and violence.

Anthony J. Viera, MD, MPH, is a professor in and the chair of the Department of Community and Family Medicine at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, and an adjunct professor of public health leadership at the University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health. Among his interests is the role of policy in prevention of adverse health outcomes.

Garen Wintemute, MD, MPH, is an emergency medicine physician at the University of California at Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, California, where he is the director of the Violence Prevention Research Program and the University of California Firearm Violence Research Center. He is a leading expert in the fields of injury epidemiology and the prevention of firearm violence.

John L. Young, MD, MTh, is a clinical professor of psychiatry at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. His academic interests focus on intersections of religion, law, and psychiatry.

Daria Zvetina is the director of grants at Cure Violence, where she provides human services program design and implementation, government and foundation proposal development, research, writing, editing, and technical assistance.