AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

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AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

About the AMA Journal of Ethics

Issue Editor Bios

Megan Patrick Alcauskas, MD, was a neurology resident at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City when she edited the December 2006 issue on Global Health: Ethics of International Medical Volunteerism. She received her MD from the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. Her interest in international health and medical ethics began after she volunteered at a rural health clinic in Haiti as an undergraduate at Boston College. She spent her junior year at Oxford University studying medical sociology, specifically the interaction between medicine and politics in developing countries. While in medical school, Megan interned for a summer at the Department of Health and Human Services in the Global Health Office and was a member of AMSA's National Health Policy Taskforce. She was also founder and editor of a health policy newsletter and was active in the hospital's bioethics committee. Her work can be found in Medical Economics and The P&S Journal as well as in numerous student and resident publications.

James Aluri, MA, was a third-year medical student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore when he was the editor of the April 2017 issue on moral psychology and “difficult” clinician-patient relationships. Previously, he spent a year as a research associate with the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues. He received a BA in biological sciences and in musical studies from the University of Southern California and an MA from the Bioethics & Society Programme at King’s College London. His research interests focus on medical ethics education and the history of medical education.

Jordan P. Amadio, MD, MBA, was a senior neurosurgery resident at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, when he edited the January 2015 issue of Virtual Mentor on intervening in the brain: ethics and neurosurgery. Dr. Amadio is co-founder of NeuroLaunch, the world’s first neuroscience startup accelerator. He was educated at Princeton and MIT and received his MD at Harvard Medical School. In 2014, he received the American Medical Association Foundation’s Excellence in Medicine award recognizing his leadership in the early-stage medical innovation community and was named “40 under 40” by the Atlanta Business Chronicle. His research interests lie at the interface of emerging technologies and the human nervous system, including neuromodulation and wearable computing.

George L. Anesi was a fourth-year medical student at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, Ohio, pursuing a dual degree as a graduate student in the Department of Bioethics, when he edited the October 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor on Ethical Challenges in Modern Cardiovascular Medicine. His research in the Center for Genetic Research Ethics and Law (CGREAL) focuses on personalized genomic medicine and end-of-life care. He received a BS in biological chemistry and a BA in chemistry from The University of Chicago, where he was editor in chief of the Chicago Maroon.

Claire K. Ankuda, MD, MPH was an intern in family medicine in the urban underserved track at the University of Washington in Seattle when she edited the July 2012 issue of Virtual Mentor on the ethics of shared decision making. She is a graduate of the University of Vermont College of Medicine and the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research interests include the assessment of the quality of decision making, especially at the end of life; surrogate decision making; and disparities in end-of-life care.

Adam Aronson was a second-year medical student at Washington University School of Medicine in Saint Louis, Missouri, when he edited the November 2012 issue on improving allocation of limited resources. His research interests include cancer, Alzheimer disease, and other diseases of aging. He is considering a career in oncology.

Anne Bertkau was a fourth year medical student at New York University when she edited the April 2005 issue on Professional Self Regulation. She graduated magna cum laude from Amherst College in 1999 and worked as a consultant for McKinsey and Company before beginning medical school. At NYU, Anne helped to establish a professional development curriculum for medical students. She planned on doing a residency in internal medicine following medical school.

Laura M. Blinkhorn, MD was an intern at Swedish Family Medicine Residency-First Hill in Seattle when she edited the October 2013 issue on mental illness and the law. She is a 2013 graduate of the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. Her professional interests include primary care management of mental illness, cross-cultural medicine, and health care for the homeless.

David R. Block was a fourth-year medical student at University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences when he was editor for the Medicine and the Social Contract issue of Virtual Mentor in April 2004. He received a BA with honors in biomedical ethics and biology from Brown University in May 1999. While at Brown, he spent summers at the Center for Bioethics at the University of Pennsylvania and at the Hastings Center. He also worked as an editor for The Catalyst, the university's interdisciplinary humanities and sciences magazine. Following graduation, he completed a one-year fellowship at the Institute for Ethics at the American Medical Association in Chicago. At the time of his issue's publication, David planned a career as a child and adolescent psychiatrist.

Allison R. Bond, MA, was a third-year medical student at Boston University School of Medicine when she edited the July 2013 issue on incentives and motivation in health care. She holds a master’s degree in science, health, and environmental reporting from New York University and a bachelor of science degree in journalism from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism. She has written about science and medicine for a variety of publications, including Scientific American, Scientific American MIND, Discover magazine, and Reuters Health. Her academic interests include rheumatology, endocrinology, and the intersection of medicine and journalism.

Meredith Broderick, MD, joined the faculty at University Hospitals of Cleveland Case Medical Center as assistant professor in the Department of Neurology in August 2008. Dr. Broderick completed her residency training in neurology at University Hospitals of Cleveland Case Medical Center and a fellowship in sleep medicine at the Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic in Palo Alto, California. Her interests include behavioral sleep medicine and raising awareness about sleep disorders. Dr Broderick was editor for the September 2008 issue of Virtual Mentor on ethical issues in sleep medicine.

Nathaniel J. Brown had completed 2 years of medical school and was pursuing a doctorate in the Department of Health Care Ethics in the Saint Louis University MD/PhD program in May 2009 when he edited the Virtual Mentor issue on specialty choice and business decisions in medicine. His interest is in business ethics in medicine, and he is affiliated with the Bander Center for Medical Business Ethics at Saint Louis University.

Bob Burke was a second-year medical student at Stanford University when he edited the Virtual Mentor issue on Physicians in Public Roles in December 2005. Bob graduated summa cum laude from Boston College with a degree in biochemistry. He lived and worked in Warsaw, Poland, with his wife, Jessica, while she completed a Fulbright fellowship. At Stanford, Bob evaluated the ethics of clinical trials in the developing world at the Institute for OneWorld Health, worked at the Center for Advanced Pediatric Education, a simulator-based training program for residents and nurses in pediatrics, and conducted basic science research in the Department of Pediatric Infectious Disease.

Marley E. Burns was a second-year medical student at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill when she edited the September 2012 issue of Virtual Mentor on confidentiality. Her primary research interests are in pediatrics. Burns recently co-authored six review articles for The Monday Life, a nonprofit organization working to improve the hospital environment for pediatric patients (www.themondaylife.org). She is also involved with research exploring the transition from pediatric to adult health care for adolescents with chronic health conditions.

David Buxton was a resident in adult psychiatry at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, when he edited the July 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor on pediatric palliative care. He graduated from Emory University with a bachelor’s degree in religious studies with a focus in Tibetan Buddhism. Dr. Buxton studied medicine at the Medical College of Virginia Campus at Virginia Commonwealth University, graduating with honors in psychiatry. During medical school, Dr. Buxton founded the Honduras Outreach Medical Brigade Relief Effort, a nonprofit student-driven medical mission group that provides health care and sustainable development to local communities in Honduras. He was introduced to the field of pediatric palliative care when working with Noah’s Children, a pediatric palliative care program in Richmond, Virginia.

Adrienne Carmack, MD, was a fourth-year resident in urology at the University of Miami when she served as a theme issue editor for the January 2006 issue on Ethical Issues in Screening. A native Texan, she received her BS in human physiology from Boston University after spending two years at the Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science. She received her medical degree from the Texas A&M University College of Medicine. Her primary areas of interest are medical ethics, medical literature, and education. While in medical school, Adrienne spent a month at the Journal of the American Medical Association learning the editorial process.

Sophia Cedola was a second-year medical student at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City when she edited the December 2013 issue on medicine’s role in the “good death.” She earned her BS in psychology, graduating summa cum laude with thesis honors, from Tufts University in 2010 and completed the Bryn Mawr College Postbaccalaureate Premedical Program in 2011. She has worked for the Columbia University Medical Center Cardiothoracic Surgery Lab and the multi-institutional Lung Transplant Outcomes Group. Her interests include medical education, quality improvement, organ donation and transplantation, palliative care, and end-of-life issues.

Karel-Bart Celie was a second-year medical student in the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University in New York City when he edited the May 2016 issue on clinical ethics consultation. Prior to medical school, he studied philosophy at Boston College, and he hopes to combine a career in surgery with ethics. His philosophical interests include bioethics, personhood in medical ethics, and metaphysics.

Arina Evgenievna Chesnokova, MPH, was a third-year medical student at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas when she edited the March 2016 issue on medicine and the law. Arina completed her masters of public health degree at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health in 2011, where she developed a special interest in health law and public health ethics. Subsequently, she worked as a researcher at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia PolicyLab. Her scholarly interests include reproductive health law and policy and geospatial components of health disparities.

Jennifer Chevinsky was a third-year medical student when she edited the June 2013 issue of Virtual Mentor on physician leadership and team-based care. As a student participant in the University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine’s SELECT Program, Jennifer was on rotations at the Lehigh Valley Health Network in Allentown, Pennsylvania at the time. She was the student director for the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities and a member of the American Medical Association medical student section’s Committee on Bioethics and Humanities. She has a degree with honors in bioethics in cross-cultural perspectives from the University of Connecticut’s combined program in medicine. Jennifer’s interests include international perspectives on bioethics, Jewish medical ethics, genethics, and values-based practice in medical education.

Barbara Chubak, MD, was a fellow in the Department of Bioethics at the Cleveland Clinic when she served as a theme issue editor for the August 2009 issue of Virtual Mentor on Problematizing the Principle of Autonomy.

Bennett William Clark was a fourth-year medical student at Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto, California, and was applying for residency in internal medicine when he served as the September 2009 theme issue editor on the topic of Ethical Questions in Genetic Testing. He graduated from Yale with a bachelor's degree in philosophy.

Margaret Cocks, MD, PhD, was a second-year resident in anatomic and clinical pathology at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore when she edited the August 2016 issue on ethics in pathology. She completed her PhD in the history and philosophy of science at Cambridge University.

Alessandra Colaianni was a third-year medical student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore when she edited the February 2013 issue on the hospital's roles as a business and a public service. Her research interests include medical ethics, medical culture, and narrative medicine. Prior to medical school, she worked at the Advisory Board Company, a health care administration consulting firm in Washington, D.C.

Terri Davis was a physician assistant and third-year medical student at West Virginia University (WVU) School of Medicine in Morgantown when she was the editor of the January 2017 issue on human trafficking and medicine. After meeting members of the Hope and Liberation Coalition in preparation for working on the issue, she coordinated an exhibit with them at WVU’s Health Sciences Center and the Morgantown Art Center for National Slavery and Human Trafficking Prevention Month, January 2017.

Matthew W. DeCamp entered the Duke University Medical Scientist Training Program in 2000 following completion of a BS from Purdue University. He was the theme issue editor for Standards of Care, which appeared in the December 2004 edition of Virtual Mentor. At the time of his issue's publication, he was in his third year of graduate work in the Department of Philosophy, and his PhD thesis examined global distributive justice. His past research interests included the effect of health care commodification on the patient-physician relationship and the ethical issues raised in population-based genetics research. Matt had been actively involved with Duke University's Institutional Review Board, the Center for the Study of Medical Ethics and Humanities, the Center for Genome Ethics, Law and Policy, and the Program on Global Health and Technology Access.

Monya De was a fourth-year medical student at the University of California-Irvine College of Medicine when she was the editor of the February 2004 issue of Virtual Mentor on Paternalism in Medicine. Monya graduated from Stanford University, where she earned a degree in human biology with honors and a minor in English literature. At Stanford, she studied biomedical ethics and was a medical columnist and arts editor for the Stanford Daily newspaper. After graduation, she worked in strategy consulting for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. During her medical school years, she traveled to Ecuador to study Spanish and volunteer in between climbing volcanoes and exploring the Galapagos Islands.

Robert Deiss was a fourth-year student at the University of California at San Diego School of Medicine when he served as theme issue editor for the August 2007 issue on Language, Culture, and Belief in the Medical Encounter.

Gaurav Jay Dhiman was a third-year medical student at the University of Miami Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine when he edited the June 2015 issue on ethics in rehabilitation medicine. After completing his clinical training, he hopes to become a clinical, bioethics, and health policy professor and possibly join a think tank. He has interned for US Senators Dianne Feinstein and Bill Nelson and for the Center for American Progress.

Natasha H. Dolgin was a sixth-year MD/PhD candidate at the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine in Worcester when she edited the February 2016 issue on liver transplantation. Her doctoral work is on liver transplantation policy and outcomes research undertaken in the Clinical and Population Health Research Program and the Department of Surgery. She is on the Ethics, Grievances, and Professional Standards Committee of the Massachusetts Medical Society and previously worked as a research assistant in the Department of Bioethics at the Cleveland Clinic.

Julia C. Dombrowski was a fifth-year student in the joint MD/MPH program of Duke University School of Medicine and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Public Health when she edited the May 2004 issue on Medicine's Response to Terrorism. She received a BS degree in biology from the University of New Mexico in 1998. During the 2002-2003 academic year, she completed a Doris Duke Clinical Research Fellowship at The University of North Carolina. Julia put her interest in bioethics into practice by volunteering in a needle exchange program and working as a biomedical research trainee in Nigeria. During a clinical research fellowship in 2002, she had the opportunity to learn about the ethical issues inherent in research with human subjects. Julia has been writing, both scientifically and creatively, since college and plans to make writing and editing a significant part of her medical career.

Jeffrey M. Dueker, MPH, was a first-year medical student at Saint Louis University when he co-edited the May, 2009 issue of Virtual Mentor on the theme of Specialty Choice and Business Decisions in Medicine. He completed his master’s in public health degree at Saint Louis University and was a research assistant in the Department of Health Care Ethics. He was the first coordinator for the Bander Center for Medical Business Ethics and remains affiliated with the center. His research interests include ethics, patient safety, and public health.

Matthew L. Edwards was a third-year medical student at the University of Texas Medical Branch School of Medicine in Galveston when he edited the March 2015 issue of the AMA Journal of Ethics on ethical issues in anesthesiology. Matthew graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University and received a graduate certificate in public health from the University of Texas School of Public Health. He received a Wood Library-Museum Fellowship in Anesthesiology in 2013 and the American Osler Society’s William B. Bean Student Research Award in 2014. His research has been published in Anesthesiology, the Bulletin of Anesthesia History, and Sociological Insight.

Erin Egan, MD, JD, was a resident in the Department of Medicine at Loyola University Medical Center and a senior associate at the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy when she was the editor for the Patient Safety and Medical Error issue in March 2004.

Stephanie K. Fabbro, MD, was a first-year resident at The Ohio State University in Columbus when she edited the December 2012 issue of Virtual Mentor on getting into medical school and residency. She intended to complete a medicine internship before entering her chosen specialty, dermatology. Dr. Fabbro graduated from Northeast Ohio Medical University with her medical degree as well as her certificate in bioethics and won the North American Primary Care Research Group Award for her contribution to research in medical education. Her research and career interests include ethical innovation in medical education, complex medical dermatology, and psychocutaneous disorders.

Katie Falloon was a second-year medical student at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina, when she edited the January 2014 issue on ethics and assisted reproductive technology. She graduated magna cum laude from Yale University with a degree in English.

Colleen Farrell edited two issues of the AMA Journal of Ethics. When she was editor of the September 2013 issue on motherhood and medicine, she was a second-year medical student at Harvard Medical School in Boston, and when she was editor of the September 2016 issue on ethics and interprofessionalism in medical education, she was a fifth-year medical student at Harvard. She received her BA in women’s and gender studies from Williams College in 2010 and worked as a research assistant at the Hastings Center, a nonprofit bioethics research institute, from 2010 to 2012. She plans to pursue residency training in family medicine and has interests in primary care, creative writing, and medical education.

Miriam Fishman was a fourth-year medical student at New York University School of Medicine when she edited the April 2007 issue on Professionalism in Medical School. She received a BA in history from Yale University and was a research fellow at the FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research in Bethesda, Maryland, before entering medical school. At NYU she worked with the Professional Development Committee to design, implement, and refine a professional development curriculum for the medical students and is active in the school's free clinic.

Mariam O. Fofana was a fifth-year MD/PhD student at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, focusing on infectious disease epidemiology, when she edited the June 2014 issue of Virtual Mentor on the intersection of race, ethnicity, and medicine.

Alex Folkl, MSc, was a fourth-year medical student at the University of Vermont College of Medicine in Burlington when he edited the May 2012 issue on the patient-physician relationship. After graduating in May of 2012, he will begin a family medicine residency at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. Alex completed his BSc and MSc at the University of Guelph, in Guelph, Ontario. He plans to pursue a career in rural family and emergency medicine.

Catherine Frenkel was a third-year medical student at Albany Medical College in New York when she edited the February 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor on Ethics and Innovation in Surgery. She was a member of their Bioethics Scholars Program and edited the medical student newspaper. Catherine earned her master's degree in physiology and biophysics from Georgetown University and graduated magna cum laude from Cornell University with a bachelor of arts degree in English.

Ishani Ganguli, MD, is a physician and journalist. She was in her first-year of residency in internal medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston when she edited the September 2011 issue of Virtual Mentor on patient safety, entitled “First, Do No Harm.” Dr. Ganguli received a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from Harvard College in 2005 and an MD from Harvard Medical School in 2011. Her interests include primary care, quality and safety in health care, shared decision making, and medical education.

Melissa Gitman, MD, MPH, was a third-year resident in internal medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia when she served as the theme issue editor for the December 2009 issue on HIV Care and Ethics. She obtained her medical degree from McGill University in 2006 and her master’s degree in public health in 2009 from the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Gitman plans to pursue fellowship training in infectious diseases at Mount Sinai Medical Center in July 2010.

Allison Grady served as the Theme Issue Editor for January 2008 issue on Ethical Issues in Diagnosing and Treating Addiction. At the time her issue was released she was a senior research assistant and editor for Virtual Mentor at the American Medical Association in Chicago. Prior to her position at the AMA she was the volunteer and special projects coordinator at the Middlesex United Way in Middletown, Connecticut. A 2003 graduate of Smith College, she plans on pursuing a master's degree in nursing.

Scott B. Grant attended the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, as part of the Brown-Dartmouth Medical School program. He was a fourth-year student there when he edited the May 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor on Ethics in Cosmetic and Reconstructive Plastic Surgery. He obtained a master of bioethics degree from the University of Pennsylvania and entered general surgery residency at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital in July 2010. His research interests include enhancement; informed consent for surgery; surgical innovation; surgical error, patient safety, quality improvement, and preoperative checklists; polytrauma and mangled extremity syndrome; and the patient-doctor relationship.

Kara J. Gulewicz was completing her third year of medical school at Washington University in St. Louis when she served as student editor of Virtual Mentor. Her June 2011 issue was entitled, “Complementary and Alternative Therapies—Medicine’s Response.” Kara received a BA in biology from Cornell University and had authored papers on animal behavior published in Behavioral Neuroscience and the Journal of Zoology. Her academic interests lay at the intersection of science, ethics, and philosophy and encompassed the tensions between science and non-evidence-based claims, including religion and alternative medicine.

Kerri Hecox, MD, was a graduate student at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, pursuing an MPH in Health Policy and Administration when she served as theme issue editor for Access to Care in July 2005. She graduated from the University of Colorado School of Medicine in 2001, and completed a residency in family medicine at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro, North Carolina, in 2004. Dr. Hecox has a strong interest in understanding access-to-care barriers in the Latino population, and plans to work both domestically and in Latin America on confronting these barriers, particularly as they relate to maternal-child health issues.

Gretchen Hermes, PhD, was a fourth-year medical student at the University of Chicago when she served as the theme issue editor for Parental Competence in Medical Caregiving and Decision Making in October 2006. She received a BA in English language and literature from the University of Chicago, then worked at the Smithsonian Institution on one of the first multimedia offerings, Life Story, on the race to discovery the structure of DNA. She received a master's degree in comparative religion from Harvard Divinity School, founding an on-campus organization dedicated to the study of religion and healing, and was assistant curator of Emotions and Disease, an exhibit at the National Institutes of Medicine. Her doctorate through the Committee on Human Development examined the biological effects of chronic social isolation; her postdoctoral fellowship included an examination of the neurodegenerative changes associated with chronic infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

Shaili Jain, MD, obtained her medical degree from the University of Liverpool in England. She completed a residency in psychiatry including a chief resident position at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. She was an attending psychiatrist with Aurora Behavioral Health Systems in Wisconsin when she was the editor of the State of the Art of Healing in the 21st Century theme issue in July 2006.

Matthew Janko was a second-year medical student at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, where he was a member of the Clinical/Translational Research Pathway Program and the student government, when he edited the January 2012 issue on vaccines and ethics.

Emily Johnson was a fourth-year medical student at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora when she edited the April 2016 issue on disability, ethics, and medicine. She has a long-standing interest in working with persons with disabilities. She is pursuing a career in family medicine and plans to continue to work with this population.

W. Miller Johnstone III, MD, PhD, was a resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Buffalo in New York when he edited the September 2015 issue on gynecologic oncology. He received his MD from the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University and his PhD in endocrinology and physiology from North Carolina State University.

Trahern W. Jones was a fourth-year medical student at Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minnesota, when he edited the July 2014 issue of Virtual Mentor on ethical issues in the physician-athlete relationship. He joined the University of Arizona pediatrics residency program in Tucson in July 2014. His research interests include medical ethics and medical professionalism.

Nadi N. Kaonga, MHS, was an MD student at Tufts University Medical School and a predoctoral candidate at Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute in Boston when she edited the May 2015 issue on observing professional boundaries.

Abraar Karan, MD, was an MPH candidate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston when he edited the July 2016 issue on the ethics of international health systems development. He is a graduate of the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, where he served as the student body president and was part of the Global Health Pathway.

Jennifer Kasten, MSc, was a third-year student at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City, when she served as editor for the March 2008 issue of Virtual Mentor with the theme of Medicine and Personhood. Jennifer received a master's degree in the history of medicine from Oxford, and another master's degree in the control of infectious disease from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, where she held a Marshall Scholarship. She is interested in the history and philosophy of medicine, religion and bioethics, pediatric surgery, and tropical medicine. She hopes to prove that surgeons, too, can ask interesting questions about the world.

Dhruv Khullar was a student at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Massachusetts, where he was a fellow at the Center for Public Leadership, when he edited the August 2013 issue on ethics in cancer prevention and treatment. He is an intern at the White House Office of Management and Budget. His work has recently been published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, USA Today, and The New York Times.

Louise P. King, MD, JD, was a second-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology at Parkland Memorial Hospital in Dallas when she served as theme issue editor for the April 2008 Virtual Mentor on Medical Care for U.S. Immigrants. At the conclusion of her training, Louise hopes to combine a strong interest in bioethics and health policy with a career in gynecologic oncology.

Mark J. Kissler, MS, was a second-year medical student at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, when he edited the March 2013 issue on conscience rights and responsibilities. He holds a master’s degree in narrative medicine from Columbia University in New York City.

Eran Klein, MD, PhD, was a second-year resident in neurology at Oregon Health and Science University when he completed his theme issue on Expertise in Medicine in February 2006. He received his medical degree and a doctorate in philosophy from Georgetown University. His dissertation, directed by Edmund Pellegrino, MD, was on developing a Heideggerian approach to the epistemology of skills and expertise in medicine. He co-edited The Story of Bioethics: from Seminal Works to Contemporary Explorations with Jennifer Walter in 2003.

Rashmi Kudesia, MD, was in her third year of fellowship in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City when she edited the October 2014 issue of Virtual Mentor on ethics and reproductive care. Her clinical and research interests are polycystic ovary syndrome and access to fertility knowledge and treatment. Dr. Kudesia has a longstanding passion for reproductive ethics and women’s health advocacy. She completed medical school at Duke University and her residency in obstetrics and gynecology at the New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

Jeff Kullgren, MPH, was a second-year student at the Michigan State University College of Human Medicine when he served as editor for the January 2004 issue of Virtual Mentor. Jeff received a BS in sociology from Michigan State University and an MPH in health management and policy from the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Jeff interned at the AIDS Alliance for Children, Youth and Families in Washington, D.C., and at the U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality in Rockville, Maryland. He also worked at Chicago Health Outreach, Inc, a community health center in Chicago. Jeff's research experiences include studying the effects of welfare reform and how Medicaid managed care has affected people with HIV/AIDS. At the time of publication, he had most recently worked at the University of Michigan Economic Research Initiative on the Uninsured, where he evaluated community-based initiatives to improve uninsured adults' access to health care.

Bharat Kumar, MD, was a second-year internal medicine resident at the University of Kentucky in Lexington when he edited the May 2013 issue on Physician Activism that explored the ethics of pain measurement and management. He was a Yale/Stanford Johnson & Johnson Global Health Scholar and the recipient of the 2013 Jordan Fieldman, MD, Award for Healthcare Advocacy. Dr. Kumar received his MD from Saba University School of Medicine and his BA in political science from the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests include rheumatology, immunology, medical ethics, medical education, and narrative medicine.

Jackie Landess, MD, JD, was a first-year resident in psychiatry at McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University in Chicago when she edited the August 2010 issue on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity, and Patient Care. She received her MD from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and a JD from Indiana School of Law in Indianapolis. Her research interests include adolescent and forensic psychiatry; particularly policy work to reduce juvenile delinquency and improve adolescents’ transition from the foster care system. Further research interests include patients’ rights and access to care, especially in rural settings.

Tom LeBlanc was a recent graduate from the Duke University School of Medicine in September 2006 when he edited the Virtual Mentor issue on Humanist Approaches to the End of Life. He received a bachelor's degree in biomedical ethics from Brown University. While at Duke he also earned a master's degree in philosophy, focusing on topics in medical ethics. At the time of his issue's publication, he had begun his internship in internal medicine at Duke University and had career interests in palliative care, oncology, medical ethics, medical education, and literature in medicine.

Chuan-Mei Lee, MD, MA, graduated from Harvard Medical School in May 2012 and began a residency in psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco shortly after editing the June 2012 issue on psychiatry. She holds a master’s degree in Modern Thought and Literature from Stanford University and has an interest in medical humanities.

Jeanne Lee, MD, was a second-year internal medicine resident at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina when she edited an issue of Virtual Mentor on the theme of Quality of Life and Geriatric Patients in June 2008. She received a bachelor of science degree at University of South Alabama and her medical degree at Duke School of Medicine. She plans on practicing hospitalist medicine after her training.

Justin P. Lee was a third-year medical student at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles when he served as editor for the February 2009 issue on Professional Responsibility in Preventing Violence and Abuse. He received a bachelor of arts degree in English from the University of California, Berkeley, specializing in Shakespeare and Renaissance literature. His interests include medical education, medical journalism, and medical humanities. He plans to pursue a career in hospital medicine.

Sarah Lee was a second-year medical student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York City when she served as the theme issue editor for the Caring for the Incarcerated Patient, in February 2008. Sarah received a bachelor of arts degree in comparative literature from Columbia University in 2001 and worked as an editor for The Paris Review and Random House before applying to medical school. She has particular interest in working with underserved communities, both in the United States and abroad.

Steve Y. Lee, MD, is a graduate of Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, where he completed a scholarly concentration in biomedical ethics. Dr. Lee was a first-year resident in the Department of Medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine when he edited the October 2011 issue of Virtual Mentor called “Doctors after Hours—Physicians as Citizens.” He was the 2010-2011 AMA-Medical Student Section delegate to the AMA House of Delegates.

Justin List, MAR, a former fellow at the Institute of Ethics at the American Medical Association and previous editor for Yale University's Interdisciplinary Center for Bioethics, was a second-year student at the Stritch School of Medicine at Loyola University Chicago when he explored the topic of Illness-Poverty Relationship in Virtual Mentor's November 2006 issue.

Ajay Major, MBA, was a second-year medical student at Albany Medical College in New York when he served as editor for the March 2014 issue on the problem of mistreatment in medical education. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Union College in 2012 as part of the Leadership in Medicine Program, an eight-year combined-degree BS/MBA/MD program with Union Graduate College and Albany Medical College. He was the editor in chief of the Union College Concordiensis for two years and founded in-Training, the online magazine for medical students. He is also a medical student advocate and works with Students for a National Health Program, Physicians for Human Rights, and the Student National Medical Association.

Jay R. Malone, MD, MS, was the pediatric chief resident at The Children’s Hospital of Oklahoma in Oklahoma City when he edited the October 2012 issue of Virtual Mentor on pediatric critical care and emergency medicine. He serves on the ethics committee for The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center and is a facilitator for the clinical ethics course at The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine. He received his MD, certificate in public health, and BS with distinction in zoology and biomedical sciences from The University of Oklahoma. He received his MS in health care ethics from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He plans to pursue fellowship training in pediatric critical care medicine.

Weisheng Renee Mao was a third-year medical student at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, DC, when she was the editor of the May 2017 issue on ethics in mental health and oncology. She is interested in psychiatry, medical ethics, and medical humanities.

Marta Michalska-Smith edited two issues of the AMA Journal of Ethics. When she was editor of the February 2015 issue on the culture of medicine, she was a second-year medical student at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, and when she was editor of the August 2017 issue on iatrogenesis in pediatrics, she was a first-year medicine-pediatrics resident at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. She received her MD from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine and her BA in philosophy from the University of Notre Dame. Her interests include the culture of medicine, quality improvement, and the intersection of medicine, public policy, and ethics.

Deirdre Coyle Masterton was a fourth-year medical student at New York University and one of the founding members of the Professional Development Committee there, when she edited the December 2003 issue on Professionalism in Medical School. Deirdre graduated from Washington & Lee University with a biology degree in 2000 and planned a career in obstetrics and gynecology.

Andrew C. Miller, MD, was a fellow in pulmonary and critical care medicine in a joint training program at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center in Pennsylvania when he edited the September 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor on the topic of Natural Disasters, Quarantine, and Public Health Emergencies. Dr. Miller graduated from Southern Illinois University School of Medicine in 2005 and completed his residency and chief residency in a 5-year combined emergency medicine and internal medicine training program at the State University of New York (SUNY) Downstate/Kings County Hospital in Brooklyn. He has been active in postdisaster medical relief work domestically and in Pakistan, the Dominican Republic, and Haiti. He has received the 2010 AMA Paul Ambrose Award, the 2009 AMA Foundation Leadership Award, and the 2008 EMRA Leadership Excellence Award.

Kathleen K. Miller, MD, graduated from the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in 2014. She served as editor for the journal twice. During her second year of medical school, she edited the May 2011 issue of Virtual Mentor on The Country Doctor. Four years later, as a first-year resident in pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Dr. Miller edited the April 2015 issue of the renamed AMA Journal of Ethics on Ethics in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Autism.

Elizabeth Miranda, MPH, was a second-year medical student at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles when she served as editor for the February 2014 issue of Virtual Mentor on unwarranted variation in medical care. She completed her undergraduate education at Harvard University in 2011 with a degree in organismic and evolutionary biology and a minor in global health and health policy. In 2012, she graduated from The Dartmouth Institute of Health Policy and Clinical Practice with a master’s degree in public health. Her scholarly interests include health policy, quality improvement, and disparities in health care.

Megan Moreno, MD, earned her medical degree at George Washington University, where she was involved in writing and editing for GW's health policy journal, Reform Watch. She completed a pediatric residency and then took a chief resident position at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. During residency, Dr. Moreno also obtained a master of science degree in education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She was in the process of pursuing a fellowship in adolescent medicine when she was the editor for the March 2005 theme issue on Adolescent Medicine. In October of that year, Dr Moreno edited another issue of Virtual Mentor, this one on Ethical Decision Making in the Diagnosis, and Treatment of STDs. Her primary areas of interest are adolescent medicine and the role of education in illness prevention, particularly in the area of STDs and reproductive health.

Peter Moschovis was a fourth-year student at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine and an MPH candidate at the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health when he worked on the May 2005 issue that explored the Role of Faith in the Patient-Physician Relationship. He graduated from the University of Illinois at Chicago with a BA in philosophy in 2000. Following graduation, Peter spent a year as a Fulbright Scholar in Greece, studying refugee and immigrant public health. His work in Greece focused on the health needs of Kurdish and Afghan refugees and victims of trauma in post-war Kosovo. He also worked as a medical volunteer at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics. Peter's research interests include the medical ethics of ancient philosophy, medical ethics education, and the role of spirituality and theology in the formation of ethical beliefs.

Samyukta Mullangi was a dual-degree student at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Business School in Boston when she edited the August 2014 issue of Virtual Mentor on the humanities in medical education. Her interest in narrative medicine stems from her days as a creative writing major at Emory University, where she studied with novelist Jim Grimsley and US poet laureate Natasha Trethewey. She serves on the steering committee for Arts&Humanities@HMS and freelances for Scientific American.

Melanie Mund, MBe, was a fourth-year medical student at SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn, New York, when she edited the April 2011 issue on The “R” Word—Ethical Allocation of Medicine’s Services. She received her BA in English and her master’s in bioethics from the University of Pennsylvania. She will be entering the residency program in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Connecticut.

Hari Nadiminti was a fourth-year medical student at the University of Miami School of Medicine when he edited the September 2005 issue on the Ethical Challenges in Organ Donation. He attended the University of Miami and received a BS with honors in biology in 1999. Hari's interest in medical ethics began during college when taking a religion and bioethics course in the department of religious studies. After the course, he worked on a two-year medical ethics research project focusing on determining the ideal health care surrogate.

Vinod E. Nambudiri, MD, MBA, was a resident in internal medicine and dermatology in the Harvard Combined Medicine-Dermatology Residency Training Program in Boston when he served as the editor for the December 2014 issue of Virtual Mentor on telemedicine’s challenges for the medical profession. His interests include complex medical dermatology, medical leadership, and the integration of technology into medicine.

Lina Nayak was a second-year medical student at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis when she served as the November 2007 theme issue editor. Ms. Nayak graduated summa cum laude from Northwestern University and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Ms. Nayak has published in Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, the Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, and the NATO Science Series. She served on the board of directors for Student Pugwash, the U.S. student affiliate of the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs, and moderated the Health Working Group for their 2007 national conference. Ms. Nayak was also active in Medical Student Government and served as a representative to the American Association of Medical Colleges.

Alon B. Neidich was a medical student at Tufts University School of Medicine in Boston when he edited the March 2012 issue of Virtual Mentor on organ transplantation. He conducted research in transplant immunology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He obtained a bachelor’s degree with honors in law, letters, and society from the University of Chicago, where he was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow investigating informed consent and women’s attitudes towards obstetric and pediatric biobanks. His work has been published in the American Journal of Transplantation, Progress in Transplantation, the American Journal of Medical Genetics, the Journal of Medical Ethics, and The New Physician.

Jacquelyn Nestor was a fifth-year MD/PhD student at Hofstra-Northwell School of Medicine at Hofstra University in Hempstead, New York, when she edited the December 2016 issue on ethics in neuropsychology. Her thesis research examined the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. She is also interested in the ethical questions raised by emerging technologies and end-of-life care.

Thomas Ng was the theme issue editor for Patients, Doctors, and Medical Device Technologies which appeared in the February 2007 edition of Virtual Mentor. At the time of his issue's publication, Thomas was a second-year student in the MD/PhD program at the University of Southern California and the California Institute of Technology. Prior to moving to Los Angeles, he earned a BS in bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley. His research interests include neuroscience, medical imaging, and the application of technological advances in medicine and health care.

Lisa Nijm was a recent graduate of the MD/JD program at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine and School of Law when she served as the theme issue editor for the Ethics of Quality Care in June 2004. She accepted a residency in ophthalmology at the University of Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary in Chicago.

Babak J. Orandi, MD, MSc, was a first-year general surgery resident at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore when he edited the April 2009 issue of Virtual Mentor on the theme of Ethics in Clinical Research. A former Fulbright fellow and a past fellow of the NIH’s Clinical Research Training Program, he received his undergraduate, medical, and master’s (in clinical research) degrees from the University of Michigan.

Rimma Osipov was a third-year medical student and a PhD candidate in the Institute for the Medical Humanities at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston when she edited the July 2011 Virtual Mentor issue on “Physician Authors.” She received her BA in history from UCLA in 2006. Her research interests include history of medicine, literature and medicine, and, particularly, medical education.

Byram H. Ozer, MD, PhD, was a second-year resident in neurology at the University of California, Los Angeles when he edited the August 2012 Virtual Mentor issue on personalized medicine. He received his MD and PhD degrees from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and completed his internship in internal medicine at Good Samaritan Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Neil Parikh was a second-year student at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine when he served as editor for the March 2007 issue on Media Influence on the Practice of Medicine. Neil received his undergraduate education at USC also, where he double-majored in biology and journalism. Enthusiastic about the journalism-medicine intersection, Neil had been a medical intern/reporter for the Orange County Register and with the CNN medical unit. He worked extensively with a health advocacy group to break down language barriers in hospitals and conducted clinical research in Mumbai, India, investigating the barriers that prevent HIV patients from receiving medication.

Ravi Parikh was a fourth-year student at Harvard Medical School in Boston and a Knowles Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, when he edited the November 2013 issue on patient consumerism. Ravi is the administrative chair of the Crimson Care Collaborative, a network of student-run clinics in Boston that serves patients who have limited access to primary care. His opinion pieces have been published in the Washington Post, Huffington Post, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Boston Herald, and the Tampa Bay Times, and he is an editor of Medgadget, a blog about medical technology and innovation.

Amirala Pasha, DO, MS, was a second-year resident in the Department of Internal Medicine at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland when he served as editor for the May 2014 issue of Virtual Mentor on ethical issues in geriatric care. Dr. Pasha is a graduate of the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine. He obtained his graduate degree in biomedical engineering from the Viterbi School of Engineering at the University of Southern California. Dr. Pasha has strong interests in academic medicine, primary care, health policy, law, ethics, medical humanities, and biomedical engineering.

Kathleen M. Patchan was a second-year medical student at the University of Maryland in Baltimore when she served as editor for the January 2009 issue on Medical Care for Homeless Individuals. Prior to medical school, she worked for 5 years in health policy at the Congressional Research Service and the Institute of Medicine and for 2 years at Christ House, a medical shelter for the homeless of Washington, D.C. She intends to work with underserved populations, focusing on infectious disease or internal medicine.

Nikhil A. Patel, MS, was a fourth-year medical student at the Mayo Medical School in Rochester, Minnesota, when he edited the October 2015 issue on physicians, human rights, and civil liberties. He completed an MPH in global health with interdisciplinary concentrations in public health leadership and in humanitarian studies, ethics, and human rights at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He plans to pursue a career in psychiatry and hopes to build on his multidisciplinary training and on his experience working with refugees in the US and at the Thai-Burma border by developing and scaling models of mental health care delivery for vulnerable populations, locally and globally.

Trisha Paul was a second-year medical student at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor when she edited the January 2016 issue on patient- and family-centered care. She recently published the book Chronicling Childhood Cancer: A Collection of Personal Stories by Children and Teens with Cancer (Michigan Publishing, 2015) and aspires to become a pediatric oncologist and pediatric palliative care physician.

Subha Perni was an intern at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City when she was the editor of the June 2017 issue on moral distress and medicine. A graduate of Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons, she has received awards for research in philosophy and oncology and grant funding for research on moral distress, pancreatic cancer, and cultural differences in autonomy in medical decision making.

Anthony C. Rudine, MD, MBA, was a third-year resident in the combined internal medicine and pediatrics residency program at the University of Tennessee in Memphis when he edited the March 2011 issue on Health Information Technology and Clinical Practice. After residency, he plans to complete a fellowship in neonatal and perinatal medicine and pursue a career as a clinical bioethicist.

Manish Tushar Raiji was a second-year student at Michigan State University's College of Human Medicine when he served as an editor for the May 2006 issue on Conflict of Values in the Clinical Setting. He received a BS in economics and science from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, with a research focus on economic disparities. He also served as an associate editorial page editor and columnist for the Michigan Daily. He then joined Teach for America and taught sixth-grade mathematics in Baltimore, Maryland, while concurrently receiving a master's degree in teaching from Johns Hopkins University.

Ashvini K Reddy, MD, was a resident in the Department of Ophthalmology at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, when she edited the December 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor on the topics of Ethics in Ophthalmology. Her interests include pediatric eye disease, public health, and medical ethics.

Amanda J. Redig was in her second year of the MD/PhD Medical Scientist Training Program at Northwestern University when she was the editor of the November 2004 theme issue on Research Ethics. Mandy graduated from the University of Arizona where she earned a BS with honors in biochemistry and a creative writing minor. While a student at UA, Mandy participated in laboratory research in the Veterinary Science-Microbiology Department and worked at the Arizona Cancer Center. During her first year as a medical student, Mandy worked as an intern with the Ethics Group at the American Medical Association, an experience which helped further her interest in bioethics. Mandy returned as editor of the April 2006 issue of Virtual Mentor that examined Ethical Issues Posed by Emerging Epidemics. As an aspiring research physician, she hopes to focus her career on the relationships between clinical oncology, medical research, and science policy.

Marguerite Reid Schneider was in her final year of the Medical Scientist Training Program at the University of Cincinnati when she edited the June 2016 issue on ethics and mental health. Her dissertation research focused on executive function in adolescents with and at risk for bipolar disorder. After graduating, she joined the Harvard Longwood Psychiatry Residency Program as a research track resident.

Thomas Robey, MD, PhD, was an emergency medicine resident at Yale-New Haven Hospital when he edited the June 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor. He studied medicine and bioengineering at the University of Washington and biology, engineering, and the history and philosophy of science as an undergraduate at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr. Robey co-founded Seattle’s Forum on Science, Ethics, and Policy and has taught ethics to medical and undergraduate students. He derives great meaning from being one strand in the health care safety net.

Dana Marie Roque, MD, a 2007 graduate of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill, was a first-year resident in the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences at the Magee-Womens Hospital at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center when she was a theme issue editor for the September 2007 edition of Virtual Mentor.

Emily Rothbaum was a fourth-year medical student at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York and applying for a pediatrics residency when she completed her theme issue on the Cost of Care in March 2006. She graduated from Harvard College with a degree in the history of science and medicine in 2001. Before starting medical school, she spent time doing health policy research at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities in Washington, D.C. During medical school, Emily co-founded and wrote for a health policy newsletter for medical students and faculty. As a pediatrician, she plans to combine clinical practice with continued involvement in health policy research and advocacy.

Anthony C. Rudine, MD, MBA, was a third-year resident in the combined internal medicine and pediatrics residency program at the University of Tennessee in Memphis when he edited the March 2011 issue on Health Information Technology and Clinical Practice. After residency, he plans to complete a fellowship in neonatal and perinatal medicine and pursue a career as a clinical bioethicist.

Mitali Banerjee Ruths, MD, was a second-year resident in pediatrics at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston when she served as a theme issue editor for the June 2009 issue of Virtual Mentoron Medicine and the Environment: Doing No Harm. Dr. Ruths received her medical degree at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Matthew Rysavy was a medical student at the University of Iowa’s Carver College of Medicine and a PhD candidate in epidemiology at the university’s College of Public Health in Iowa City when he edited the January 2013 issue on ethical issues in evidence-based medicine. His interests include clinical epidemiology and medical education. He has been active in the design and implementation of the evidence-based medicine curriculum at the Carver College of Medicine.

Anna Shifrin was in her second year at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, when she edited the November 2008 issue of Virutal Mentor on Ethical Questions in Prevention. She is interested in the relationship between the humanities and medicine.

Myrick C. Shinall, Jr., MD, MDiv, was completing an internship in general surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and planned to continue training as a general surgeon when he served as the October 2009 theme issue editor on the topic of Religion, Medicine, and Medical Ethics. He graduated in 2009 with a medical degree from Vanderbilt Medical School and the master of divinity degree from Vanderbilt Divinity School in Nashville.

Laura Sigman, JD, was a fourth-year medical student at the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Medicine when she completed her theme issue on system constraints to optimal medical care in May 2008. She planned to continue her medical training in pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore beginning in the summer of 2008. Prior to medical school, she received a JD from Harvard Law School and worked in health law for the U.S. Department of Justice.

William R. Smith was a third-year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta and a PhD candidate in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana, when he was the editor of the February 2017 issue on legitimacy and authority in medicine. Previously, he was a fellow in the Department of Bioethics at the National Institute of Health’s Clinical Center. His research has focused on role morality, legitimacy in health care, and the ethics of radiation policy in medical imaging.

Siddharth Srivastava was a second-year medical student at Johns Hopkins when he served as editor for an issue of VM on Public Health and Physicians as Agents of the State, published in December 2007. Sid has a strong interest in government and politics as they relate to medical ethics.

Fatima Cody Stanford, MD, MPH, was a second-year resident in internal medicine and pediatrics at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine/Palmetto Health when she edited the April 2010 issue on Medical Ethics Confronts Obesity. Dr. Stanford received her MD from the Medical College of Georgia School of Medicine. She served as a health communications fellow at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, worked as a behavioral sciences intern at the American Cancer Society, and completed a medicine and media internship at the Discovery Channel. She was a journalist for LiveStrong.com and she reviewed articles for the Journal of the National Medical Association. An American Medical Association Foundation leadership award recipient, she was selected for the Paul Ambrose Award for national leadership among resident physicians in 2009.

Alex Stark was a fourth-year medical student at the Pritzker School of Medicine at the University of Chicago when he edited the January 2011 issue on Ethics and the Role of Guidelines in Medical Practice. He graduated with a BA in philosophy with a specific interest in medical ethics from Northwestern University. He will be pursuing a career in general surgery and furthering his interest in medical and surgical ethics.

Timothy Sullivan was a second-year student at Georgetown University School of Medicine when he was the editor of the January 2007 issue on the Ethics of Cancer Care and Research. Originally from the Boston area, Tim graduated from the University of Rochester in 2003 with a BA in psychology. Following college he spent two years doing breast cancer research for the radiation oncology department at Massachusetts General Hospital. Before beginning medical school, Tim traveled to Durban, South Africa, where he lived for three months while volunteering at a small HIV clinic. In addition to medical ethics, Tim's interests include medical education, medical humanities, and disparities in health care.

Kimberly Swartz, MA, was a third-year medical student and first-year law student at the University of Florida in Gainesville when she edited the April 2014 issue on third parties in the clinical encounter. She obtained her bachelor’s degree in biology and master’s degree in bioethics from New York University. Her work has been published in several journals including the Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and the Journal of Juvenile Justice. Her interests lie in ethics and health policy as they pertain to pediatrics and reproductive health.

Matthis Synofzik was pursuing a joint medical and doctorate degree at the University of Tübingen when he served as the theme issue editor for the February 2005 edition that explored Quality of Life and Clinical Decision Making. His philosophical interests at that time centered on ethics, continental philosophy, and philosophy of mind, and his medical study focused on neurology and cognitive neuroscience. He was undertaking experimental work for his thesis on models of sensorimotor integration of ego-motion. These two fields of interest are reflected in Matt's extracurricular work as a nurse at the neurosurgical ICU at the University Hospital (since 2001) and as a research assistant at the Department of Medical Ethics (since 2002). Matt has put his personal and academic concern for the improvement of health in developing countries into practice by providing medical and social work services in Guatemala (2001) and in Sudan (2004).

Zujaja Tauqeer was a third-year medical student at Harvard Medical School in Boston when she was editor of the March 2017 issue on language and hierarchy in medicine. She previously did graduate work in history of medicine as a Rhodes Scholar at University of Oxford. Her research interests lie at the intersection of clinical medicine and the humanities, including the history and ethics of medical practice.

Joshua Tompkins was a second-year medical student at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles when he edited the November 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor on the topic of Gray Matters—Neuroethics in the Twenty-First Century. A veteran journalist, he has covered science and health for The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, and many other publications. He plans to specialize in psychiatry while continuing his work in journalism.

Cynthia Tsay, MPhil was a second-year medical student at the Yale School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut when she edited the December 2015 issue of AMA Journal of Ethics on Clinical Research Ethics. Her research interests include the history of medicine, medical ethics, and health policy. She received her MPhil in the history, philosophy, and sociology of science, medicine and technology from the University of Cambridge, where she wrote her thesis on the role of women physicians on the front during World War I.

Jennifer Tseng was a fourth-year student at the University of California, Davis when she edited the July 2008 issue of Virtual Mentor on Sex and Gender in Medicine. She planned to pursue a career in surgery with a particular focus on the interface between psychiatry and surgery in patient care. Her eclectic interests began when she diverted time formerly spent viewing the San Francisco Bay from her dorm room at the University of California, Berkeley to the study of a double major in history and molecular and cell biology with an emphasis in neurobiology.

Sri Lekha Tummalapalli, MD, MBA, was a second-year internal medicine resident at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City when she edited the November 2015 issue on high-value care. She graduated from Harvard University with a joint MD/MBA degree. She is interested in quality improvement, medical education, and hospital administration.

Nneka N. Ufere was a second-year medical student at Washington University in St. Louis when she served as the theme issue editor for the November 2009 issue on Humanizing Physician Learning. She graduated with high honors in molecular and cellular biology and a minor in psychology from Harvard University. At Harvard, she served as a senior editor for the Harvard Health Policy Review. In addition to medical ethics, Ms. Ufere’s interests include medical sociology, medical journalism, and disparities in health care.

Ryan Van Ramshorst, MD, was a second-year resident in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio and a National Health Service Corps Scholar when he edited the August 2011 issue of Virtual Mentor on “Caring for the Underserved.” He served on the Texas Pediatric Society Resident Section Executive Planning Committee and the Texas Pediatric Society Committee on Community Health Advocacy/Community Access to Child Health. Dr. Van Ramshorst planned on pursuing a career in primary care pediatrics and children’s health advocacy.

Laura Vricella, MD, was a third-year resident in obstetrics and gynecology at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and MetroHealth Medical Center/Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, when she edited the October 2008 issue of Virtual Mentor on ethics and neonatal intensive care. Prior to her medical training she completed a Fulbright Scholarship studying women's health care in Senegal. Her research interests include ethical and international issues in women's reproductive health.

Cameron R. Waldman, was a second-year medical student at Albany Medical College in Albany, New York, when he was the editor of the November 2016 issue on transgender health and medicine. Prior to entering medical school, Cameron worked as a research assistant at the Hastings Center, an institute for bioethics and public policy. He holds a bachelor’s degree in philosophy.

Sarah Waliany was a fourth-year medical student at Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, California, when she was the editor of the October 2016 issue on health professionals with disabilities. In addition to editorial work and medical ethics, she is interested in clinical research in oncology and the development of novel curricula in academic medicine.

Anji Wall was in the fifth year of her combined MD/PhD program at Saint Louis University in Missouri when she edited the March 2009 issue of Virtual Mentor on the theme of Challenged Patient-Physician Relationships. Her doctorate will be in health care ethics. Ms Wall's interests include research ethics and clinical ethics, particularly temporary medical volunteer work in developing countries.

Robert J. Walter, DHCE, was a third-year medical student at Loyola University's Stritch School of Medicine in Chicago when he was editor of Roman Catholic Medical Ethics: Beginning and End-of-Life Issues in May 2007. He received a BA with honors in applied philosophy and an MA in health care ethics, both from Loyola University Chicago. He earned his doctorate in health care ethics (DHCE) at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. At the time of his issue's publication, Rob was a senior associate at the Neiswanger Institute for Bioethics and Health Policy and a member of the Northern Illinois Catholic Ethics Network. His research interests include religion and ethics and end-of-life issues.

Tanyaporn Wansom, MD, MPP, was a resident in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center when she was the theme issue editor for the July 2009 issue of Virtual Mentor on Medicine in the Era of Globalization. She graduated from University of Michigan Medical School and Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. During medical school, she served as the national chair of the American Medical Student Association’s Committee on Global Health and spent over 2 years in Thailand as a Fulbright and Fogarty/NIH Clinical Research Scholar working with and advocating for marginalized populations such as injection drug users and commercial sex workers. Dr. Wansom received her bachelor’s degree with high honors from Swarthmore College with degrees in Chinese studies and biology in 2002.

Kenshata Watkins was a second-year medical student at Howard University College of Medicine when she edited the February 2011 issue on Ethical Challenges in Community-Based Participatory Research. She graduated from the University of Georgia in 2004 with a BSEd in Exercise Science/Pre-Exercise Physiology. Medicine and creative writing are her life passions. Kenshata plans on pursuing a career in social medicine, a goal that stems from experiences she had working with the HIV/AIDS and homeless communities in Washington, D.C., after college. Her other career interests include medical education, research, ethics, and understanding patients through the medical humanities.

Jennifer L. Weinberg, MD, MPH, MBE, edited two issues of Virtual Mentor. When she edited March 2010 issue on the topic of Global Health Ethics in Practice, she was an MD/MBE candidate at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Weinberg was a third-year resident in preventive medicine at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore when she again served as a Virtual Mentor editor. The April 2013 issue was on the effects of lifestyle on health. In addition to her MD, Dr. Weinberg has master’s degrees in public health and bioethics and certificates in environmental and occupational health, global health, and women’s health research. Her professional and research interests include the impact of lifestyle factors on health, health outreach and education, and ethical considerations in global health and telemedicine. She is a certified integrative yoga instructor and is certified by the Institute for Integrative Nutrition as a holistic health coach.

Charles Wells was a third-year medical student at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and was the editor of Physician Accountability, which appeared in July 2007. He earned a BA in philosophy from Princeton University, where he wrote his thesis about the influence of luck on moral status. He studied ethics and philosophy of science on a Rotary Scholarship at the University of Bristol.

James M. Wilkins, MD, DPhil, was a geriatric psychiatry fellow at Partners Healthcare in Boston when he was the editor of the July 2017 issue on quality of life in dementia. A graduate of Bowdoin College, he completed a DPhil in human genetics at the University of Oxford as a Marshall Scholar and received an MD from Harvard Medical School. He completed his psychiatry residency in the Massachusetts General Hospital-McLean Hospital Adult Psychiatry Residency Program, where he served as chief resident in geriatric psychiatry in addition to holding a fellowship in bioethics through the Center for Bioethics at Harvard Medical School. His academic interests lie at the interface of geriatric psychiatry and bioethics.

Amanda S. Xi, MD, was a transitional year resident at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit when she edited in the July 2015 issue on patient care in the ACA era. She will be continuing her training at Massachusetts General Hospital in anesthesiology. She graduated in 2015 from Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine and obtained her BSE and MSE in biomedical engineering from the University of Michigan. In addition to medical ethics, she is interested in social media (she writes at her self-titled blog), health policy, and advancing women in medicine.

Elena M. Yates was in her third year as an MD/PhD dual degree student at Saint Louis University (SLU) when she edited the January 2010 issue of Virtual Mentor on Nurses and the Medical Team. Elena received her BS in biology from the University of Dallas in 2006 with a concentration in Spanish. She was a research assistant and coordinator of SLU’s Bander Center of Medical Business Ethics and working on her doctorate in health care ethics at the time.

Shara Yurkiewicz was a second-year medical student at Harvard University when she edited the Virtual Mentor issue on The Power of Diagnosis in December 2011. She graduated cum laude from Yale University with an intensive BS in biology. Shara has conducted ethics research on personalized medicine at the Hastings Center and on palliative care at Harvard. Her other academic interests include medical education and medical journalism, and she has written for a variety of publications, including the Los Angeles Times and Discover. Shara’s blog can be found at http://blogs.plos.org/thismayhurtabit/.