AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

Journal of Ethics Header

AMA Journal of Ethics®

Illuminating the art of medicine

AMA Journal of Ethics. October 2016, Volume 18, Number 10: 1060-1063.

Contributors

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About the Contributors

Theme issue: Health Professionals with Disabilities

Theme Issue Editor

Sarah Waliany is a fourth-year medical student at Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, California. She is also the co-editor-in-chief of H&P, the Stanford Medical Student Journal. In addition to editorial work and medical ethics, her other academic interests include clinical research in oncology and the development of novel curricula in academic medicine.

Contributors

Peter Angelos, MD, PhD, is the Linda Kohler Anderson Professor of Surgery and Surgical Ethics, chief of endocrine surgery, and the associate director of the MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. He is currently president of the American Association of Endocrine Surgeons, has a busy endocrine surgery practice, and also contributes regularly to the literature on surgical ethics and endocrine surgery.

Michael Argenyi, MD, is a first-year resident in family medicine at McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University in Chicago, where he is based at Erie Family Health Humboldt Park. A graduate of Creighton University School of Medicine, he identifies as a deaf physician and is an active board member of the Association of Medical Professionals with Hearing Losses.

Samuel R. Bagenstos, JD, is the Frank G. Millard Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School in Ann Arbor. He formerly served as principal deputy assistant attorney general for civil rights at the United States Department of Justice, where he supervised the department’s disability rights enforcement.

Deborah Baker, DNP, CRNP, is senior vice president for nursing at the Johns Hopkins Health System in Baltimore, where she also serves as the vice president of nursing and patient care services for the Johns Hopkins Hospital. In addition, she serves as associate dean for clinical affairs and is also a member of the School of Nursing Advisory Board.

Ben Case is an MPH candidate at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at The George Washington University in Washington, DC, and a chapter advisor for Global Bridges, a global health organization. He received his BA from the University of Michigan. He has a congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and is involved in advocacy issues in the disabilities community.

Patricia M. Davidson, PhD, RN, is the dean and a professor of nursing at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, where she has introduced a new degree program and works to increase diversity of faculty and students and to increase community engagement. A global leader in cardiac health for women and vulnerable populations, Dr. Davidson’s research focuses on supporting persons living with chronic conditions and developing innovative models of transitional care.

Joel A. DeLisa, MD, MS, is a professor emeritus of physical medicine and rehabilitation at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, New Jersey. He is also a member of the Institute of Medicine. He has chaired the American Board of Medical Specialties, the Educational Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates, the Association of Academic Physiatrists, the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, and the administrative board of the Council of Academic Societies (now the Council of Faculty and Academic Societies) of the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Jennifer Dotzenrod, MPP, is associate dean for enrollment management and student affairs at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore. Over the previous several decades, she has developed innovative policies for student admissions and strategies to promote diversity, inclusion, and student success.

Maureen Fausone is a second-year medical student at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, Michigan. She received a BA from Stanford University. She is has a spinal cord injury and a growing interest in issues of diversity and inclusion in medicine, particularly for people with disabilities.

Michael D. Fetters, MD, MPH, MA, is a professor of family medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor, where he is also co-director of the Department of Family Medicine, co-director of the University of Michigan Mixed Methods Research and Scholarship Program, co-editor of the Journal of Mixed Methods Research, and founder and director of the Japanese Family Health Program. His research focuses on the influence of culture on decision making as well as the application, dissemination, and development of mixed methods research methodology.

Leslie Francis, PhD, JD, is distinguished professor of law and philosophy and director of the Center for Law and Biomedical Sciences at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. Editor of the forthcoming Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics (Oxford University Press), she has served as the president of the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association. She writes widely on philosophical issues in disability and also provides pro bono representation for people subject to guardianship determinations.

Christina A. Godack, MA, is the chief of staff and dean of marketing and communications at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore. Previously, she served as executive vice president of public relations at Hartt and Company, vice president of public relations at Weber Shandwick, assistant director of news and information at Johns Hopkins University, and account executive with Ogilvy and Mather Public Relations. She is committed to a diverse and dedicated nursing profession.

Lisa I. Iezzoni, MD, MSc, is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of the Mongan Institute Health Policy Center at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. She has published and spoken widely on risk adjustment and has edited Risk Adjustment for Measuring Health Care Outcomes, now in its fourth edition (Health Administration Press, 2013). She currently studies health care quality, delivery system, and policy issues relating to persons with disabilities.

Krista L. Kaups, MD, MSc, is a professor of clinical surgery at the University of California San Francisco-Fresno, where she is also the program director for the Surgical Critical Care Fellowship. Her professional interests include trauma, critical care, global health, and physician well-being.

Jacob Jay Lindenthal, PhD, DrPH, is a professor of psychiatry at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, New Jersey. He holds doctoral degrees in medical sociology and in public health. His current research interests are in ethnicity and health and public medical education.

Michael McKee, MD, MPH, is an assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School in Ann Arbor. He received his MD from the University of Florida College of Medicine and his MPH from the University of Rochester. He has a congenital bilateral sensorineural hearing loss and also writes about best practices for individuals with hearing loss. His clinical and research interests focus on health care issues for people with disabilities,

Marie N. Nolan, PhD, RN, is executive vice dean and a professor at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in Baltimore, where she also leads academic affairs and holds a joint faculty appointment in the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. Widely published in the nursing and multidisciplinary research literature, Dr. Nolan has edited two books, Measuring Patient Outcomes (SAGE Publications, 2000) and Transplantation Nursing: Acute and Long-term Management (Appleton and Lange, 1995). She has also served on advisory panels of the National Institutes of Health regarding end-of-life care research.

Alicia Ouellette, JD, is the president and dean of Albany Law School in Albany, New York. Her research focuses on health law, disability rights, family law, children’s rights, and human reproduction.

Frederick Romberg, MD, is a resident in anesthesiology at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. First diagnosed as dyslexic in college, he is a graduate of California Institute of Technology and Yale School of Medicine.

Cynda Hylton Rushton, PhD, RN, is the Anne and George L. Bunting Professor of Clinical Ethics at the Berman Institute of Bioethics and the School of Nursing at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, where she has a joint appointment in the School of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics. A founding member of the Berman Institute, Dr. Rushton co-chairs Johns Hopkins Hospital’s Ethics Committee and Consultation Service. She has spent several decades developing innovative policies for student admissions and strategies to promote diversity, inclusion, and student success.

Bennett A. Shaywitz, MD, is the Charles and Helen Schwab Professor in Dyslexia and Learning Development at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and co-director of the Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity. A physician-scientist (specializing in child neurology), Dr. Shaywitz is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Sally E. Shaywitz, MD, is the Audrey G. Ratner Professor in Learning Development at Yale University School of Medicine in New Haven, Connecticut, and co-director of the Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity. A physician-scientist (specializing in developmental behavioral pediatrics), Dr. Shaywitz is the author of Overcoming Dyslexia (Knopf, 2003) and a member of the National Academy of Medicine. She is frequently asked to testify before Congress about dyslexia, most recently in May 2016, before the US Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee.

Anita Silvers, PhD, is a professor in and chair of the Department of Philosophy at San Francisco State University. Silvers has been awarded the American Philosophical Association Quinn Prize for service to philosophy and philosophers and the Phi Beta Kappa Society Lebowitz Prize for excellence in philosophical thought. She is a long-time member of the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital Ethics Committee and has been including disability perspectives in her writing on bioethics for a quarter-century.

Philip Zazove, MD, MM, is a professor in and chair of the Department of Family Medicine at the University of Michigan Health System in Ann Arbor, where he has been active in clinical, educational, research, and administrative activities. He was born with a profound hearing loss, graduated from Northwestern University, received his MD from Washington University in St. Louis, and completed a residency in family practice at the University of Utah Hospitals. His main area of research is health services for deaf and hard of hearing people.