History of Medicine
Mar 2019

How Communities Attracted Physicians After World War II

Amber Dushman, MA, MLIS
AMA J Ethics. 2019;21(3):E297-299. doi: 10.1001/amajethics.2019.297.

Abstract

Since the end of World War II, the Council on Medical Service of the American Medical Association (AMA) has conducted a Physicians Placement Service to assist physicians seeking a practice location and communities seeking physicians. As part of this service, the AMA offered pamphlets that included articles and exhibits. This article features select images from one of those pamphlets.

Finding Each Other at the War’s End

The Council on Medical Service of the American Medical Association (AMA) has helped physicians find practice communities and communities find physicians through the Physicians’ Placement Service, which was established at the end of World War II. At that time, in many communities, one barrier to securing physicians’ services was a lack of modern medical facilities. To encourage communities to develop medical facilities, the AMA’s Committee on Medical and Related Facilities published a pamphlet, “Community Efforts Provide Medical Facilities.”1 The pamphlet provided specific descriptions and photographic examples of how some communities succeeded in attracting physicians. Images shown here are not the best or the only examples, but the facilities shown reveal a sample of community health care settings observed and documented by members of the Physicians’ Placement Service and compiled in its guide. Pamphlets included articles and exhibits titled “How Little Towns Get Good Doctors” and “Bringing Doctors to Main Street” and were distributed as part of a public outreach effort.2

Figure 1. Reception Room

Figure 1 mhst2-1903

Courtesy of the American Medical Association Archives.1

 

Figure 2. Office

Figure 2 mhst2-1903

Courtesy of the American Medical Association Archives.1

 

Figure 3. Hospital Bedroom

mhst2-1903

Courtesy of the American Medical Association Archives.1

 

Figure 4. Emergency Room

Figure 4 mhst2-1903

Courtesy of the American Medical Association Archives.1

 

Figure 5. Kitchen

Figure_5_mhst2-1903

Courtesy of the American Medical Association Archives.1

References

  1. American Medical Association. Community efforts provide medical facilities [pamphlet]. 1955. Council on Medical Service Collection; File 818. Chicago, IL: American Medical Association Archives.
  2. American Medical Association. Committee on Medical and Related Facilities. In: Proceedings from the Clinical Session, House of Delegates of the American Medical Association; December 3-5, 1957; Philadelphia, PA. https://ama.nmtvault.com/jsp/viewer.jsp?doc_id=ama_arch%2FHOD00001%2F00000062&page_name=95. Accessed November 20, 2018.

Citation

AMA J Ethics. 2019;21(3):E297-299.

DOI

10.1001/amajethics.2019.297.

Conflict of Interest Disclosure

The author(s) had no conflicts of interest to disclose. 

The viewpoints expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views and policies of the AMA.